Self confidence. You can have it.

Hi Welcome to December. I should have done this week but time just got away from me. This week I want to blog about self confidence.

SELF CONFIDENCE /ˌsɛlfˈkɒnfɪd(ə)ns
a feeling of trust in one’s abilities, qualities, and judgement.
“I feel terribly tired and completely lacking in self-confidence”
synonyms:
morale, confidence, self-assurance, belief in oneself, positiveness, assertiveness, assurance, self-reliance, selfpossession, composure, nerve, poise, presence, aplomb”she took care to build up his self-confidence by involving him in the planning”antonyms:
diffidence, unsureness
Self-confidence is a term that appears in many contexts, from improving mental health to helping people meet business goals and more. Self-confidence is more than a buzz word; it’s a genuine concept linked to mental health, wellbeing, and a positive way of being in the world. Self-confidence includes both feeling and doing.
Self-confidence is not so much a single idea as it is a process that involves how someone thinks about himself and others as well as how he functions despite challenges and uncertainties. Self-confidence applies to someone’s inner, private world and to his outer world around him or her.
The above definition explains what self-confidence is. These examples illustrate what self-confidence can look like. Self-confidence means:
Valuing yourself for who you are regardless of the blunders you make, the type of work you do or don’t do, etc.
Feeling good about yourself; feeling worthy despite imperfections
Being courageous enough to stand up for yourself and be assertive
Knowing that you’re worthy of others’ respect and friendship
Knowing and accepting the whole of you, both your strengths and weaknesses

The Meaning of Self-Confidence: A Quality-Of-Life Issue
How important is it for someone to develop self-confidence? The central issue relates to quality of life. Self-confidence influences the life someone creates for herself.
A lack of self-confidence negatively impacts someone’s quality of life. Having little self-confidence creates feelings of
Self-doubt
Unworthiness
Inferiority to others
Apathy
Loss of enjoyment
Anxiety, depression, and other mental health challenges
In contrast, self-confidence creates
An awareness of strengths, limitations, and how to live your life with both
An acceptance of one’s faults; the realization that perfectionism is neither possible nor desirable
A feeling of being complete
A sense of inner peace
An experience of balance between one’s strengths and weaknesses
The ability to create and experience happiness
Self-confidence is experiencing genuinely positive feelings about yourself while accepting your faults and foibles. A definition of self-confidence is acting assertively because you believe in your inherent worth. Self-confidence means that even when you don’t like things about yourself, you love your whole self.

How confident do you seem to others?

Affirmations
Your level of self-confidence can show in many ways: your behaviour, your body language, how you speak, what you say, and so on. Look at the following comparisons of common confident behaviour with behaviour associated with low self-confidence. Which thoughts or actions do you recognize in yourself and people around you?
Doing what you believe to be right, even if others mock or criticize you for it.
Or
Governing your behaviour based on what other people think.
Being willing to take risks and go the extra mile to achieve better things.
Or
Staying in your comfort zone, fearing failure, and so avoid taking risks.
Admitting your mistakes, and learning from them.
Or
Working hard to cover up mistakes and hoping that you can fix the problem before anyone notices.
Accepting compliments graciously. “Thanks, I really worked hard on that prospectus. I’m pleased you recognize my efforts.”
Or
Dismissing compliments offhandedly. “Oh that prospectus was nothing really, anyone could have done it.”

As you can see from those examples, low self-confidence can be self-destructive, and it often manifests itself as negativity. Confident people are generally more positive – they believe in themselves and their abilities, and they also believe in living life to the full.

What Is Self-Confidence?

Two main things contribute to self-confidence: self-efficacy and self-esteem.
We gain a sense of self-efficacy when we see ourselves (and others similar to ourselves) mastering skills and achieving goals that matter in those skill areas. This is the confidence that, if we learn and work hard in a particular area, we’ll succeed; and it’s this type of confidence that leads people to accept difficult challenges, and persist in the face of setbacks.
This overlaps with the idea of self-esteem , which is a more general sense that we can cope with what’s going on in our lives, and that we have a right to be happy. Partly, this comes from a feeling that the people around us approve of us, which we may or may not be able to control. However, it also comes from the sense that we are behaving virtuously, that we’re competent at what we do, and that we can compete successfully when we put our minds to it.
Some people believe that self-confidence can be built with affirmations and positive thinking. I believe that there’s some truth in this, but that it’s just as important to build self-confidence by setting and achieving goals – thereby building competence. Without this underlying competence, you don’t have self-confidence: you have shallow over-confidence, with all of the issues, upset and failure that this brings.

Building Self-Confidence

So how do you build this sense of balanced self-confidence, founded on a firm appreciation of reality?
The bad news is that there’s no quick fix, or five-minute solution.
The good news is that becoming more confident is readily achievable, just as long as you have the focus and determination to carry things through. And what’s even better is that the things you’ll do to build your self-confidence will also build success – after all, your confidence will come from real, solid achievement. No-one can take this away from you!
So here are my eight steps to self-confidence,

“Low self-esteem is like driving through life with your hand brake on.” — Maxwell Maltz

1. Visualize yourself as you want to be.
“What the mind can conceive and believe it can achieve.” — Napoleon Hill
Visualization is the technique of seeing an image of yourself that you are proud of, in your own mind. When we struggle with low self-confidence, we have a poor perception of ourselves that is often inaccurate. Practice visualizing a fantastic version of yourself, achieving your goals.

2. Affirm yourself.
“Affirmations are a powerful tool to deliberately install desired beliefs about yourself.” – Nikki Carnevale
We tend to behave in accordance with our own self-image. The trick to making lasting change is to change how you view yourself.
Affirmations are positive and uplifting statements that we say to ourselves. These are normally more effective if said out loud so that you can hear yourself say it. We tend to believe whatever we tell ourselves constantly. For example, if you hate your own physical appearance, practice saying something that you appreciate or like about yourself when you next look in the mirror.

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To get your brain to accept your positive statements more quickly, phrase your affirmations as questions like, “Why am I so good in making deals?” instead of “I am so good at making deals.” Our brains are biologically wired to seek answers to questions, without analysing whether the question is valid or not.

3. Do one thing that scares you every day.
“If you are insecure, guess what? The rest of the world is too. Do not overestimate the competition and underestimate yourself. You are better than you think.” — T. Harv Eker
The best way to overcome fear is to face it head-on. By doing something that scares you every day and gaining confidence from every experience, you will see your self-confidence soar. So, get out of your comfort zone and face your fears!

4. Question your inner critic.
“You have been criticizing yourself for years, and it hasn’t worked. Try approving of yourself and see what happens.” — Louise L. Hay
Some of the harshest comments that we get come from ourselves, via the “voice of the inner critic.” If you struggle with low self-confidence, there is a possibility that your inner critic has become overactive and inaccurate. Strategies like cognitive behavioural therapy help you to question your inner critic, and look for evidence to support or deny the things that your inner critic is saying to you. For example, if you think that you are a failure, ask yourself, “What evidence is there to support the thought that I am a failure?” and “What evidence is there that doesn’t support the thought that I am a failure?”
Find opportunities to congratulate, compliment and reward yourself, even for the smallest successes.

As Mark Twain said, “A man cannot be comfortable without his own approval.”

5. Help someone else.
Helping someone else often enables us to forget about ourselves and to feel grateful for what we have. It also feels good when you are able to make a difference for someone else.
Instead of focusing on your own weaknesses, volunteer to mentor, practically assist or teach another, and you’ll see your self-confidence grow automatically in the process.

6. Care for yourself.
“Self-care is never a selfish act — it is simply good stewardship of the only gift I have, the gift I was put on earth to offer to others.” — Parker Palmer
Self-confidence depends on a combination of good physical health, emotional health and social health. It is hard to feel good about yourself if you hate your physique or constantly have low energy. Make time to cultivate great exercise, eating and sleep habits. In addition, dress the way you want to feel. You have heard the saying that “clothes make the woman.” Build your self-confidence by making the effort to look after your own needs

7. Create personal boundaries.
“Never be bullied into silence. Never allow yourself to be made a victim. Accept no one’s definition of your life, but define yourself.”– Harvey Fierstein
Learn to say no. Teach others to respect your personal space. The more control and say that you have over your own life, the greater will be your self-confidence.
8. Shift to an equality mentality.
“Wanting to be someone else is a waste of the person you are.” — Marilyn Monroe
People with low self-confidence see others as better or more deserving than themselves. Instead of carrying this perception, see yourself as being equal to everyone. They are no better or more deserving than you. Make a mental shift to an equality mentality and you will automatically see an improvement in your self-confidence.

I hope you enjoyed this blog on Self confidence.

Next week I will be offering some tips to help you with self confidence.

This blog is using extracts from my book ‘Can I Change?’ available from Amazon in Paperback or Kindle. It makes a nice stocking filler.

Until next week. Be safe and be happy

Jon X

 

Night Night.

Hi. Hope you are having a good week. This week I’m concluding my night time anxiety blog.

Has anyone found any of the tips or advice that I’ve offered helpful? If you have let me know.

So What else can you do to ease the night time anxiety? Theis is a strange one.

Make your worries real

Write down what’s on your mind at least an hour before bed. By committing thoughts to paper, you control them – they no longer control you and live on paper instead of in your head. Mentally, you can tick them off. Dr Guy Meadows suggests giving each worry a nickname, too, such as The Nag. ‘We can’t help these thoughts coming in, but they’re only a problem when they start to consume us,’ he says. ‘By giving them names, you speed up the process of defusion, so when unpleasant thoughts crop up, you can just acknowledge them – oh, there’s The Nag again – and go back to what you’re doing.’

Get moving earlier

Strenuous exercise in the evening may cause your nervous system to be too wired to sleep, says meditation teacher Will Williams. So either restructure your day to exercise in the morning, or use meditation after exercise to calm everything down and bring you back into balance.

Set clear goals

Have a clear plan for the next day, says psychologist Susanna Halonen. ‘If you know what priority number one and two are, you’ll spend less time worrying because you know those are the first two things you’ll get done. The more you turn this into a habit, the more you realise that if you plan ahead and prioritise effectively, the more easily you can get the important things done. This will lower your anxiety and help you sleep better.’

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Curb your cyberenthusiasm

If we’re going to feel worry-free at night, it’s crucially important to have a mental switch-off, says Neil Shah of The Stress Management Society. ‘So have a digital blackout for an hour before bed, unplugging all devices that could stimulate the mind.’ browsing the latest headlines online may feel like light relief, but it actually keeps your brain stimulated. He says, ‘If checking your phone is part of your end-of-day routine, do this at least half an hour before you turn the lights out so you give your eyes and brain a break. Put any electronics out of reach or on airplane mode so you won’t be tempted to pick them up in the night – or if you can, turn them off completely.’
LCD screens emit blue light, which is the same sort as sunlight, so plays havoc with our sleep hormones. ‘Checking Facebook last thing at night is like shining a miniature sun into your eyes,’ says Dr Guy Meadows of The Sleep School. ‘Our body clock gets confused and starts thinking it’s daytime again, so it inhibits the sleep hormone melatonin and releases the waking hormone cortisol.’

Leave the room

If you simply can’t get back to sleep because your head is buzzing with worry, don’t look at the clock – you’ll fret even more. ‘Just get out of bed and go into another room for 10 minutes,’ says Dr Ramlakhan. ‘Leaving the environment you feel uncomfortable in breaks the association with worries. But don’t start checking your phone or scrolling through Facebook.
Go into the living room and under a dim light read a few pages of a light-hearted book, or yesterday’s newspaper. When you feel calm, return to your bed and begin some deep breathing again.’ He adds, ‘Turn your pillow over when you get back into bed. It will feel cooler on your face and creates a separation from the last time you were lying there.’

Anxiety quick tips.

Start Deep-Breathing
If you’re not focused on how to calm your body through slow, intentional belly-breathing, you’re missing out. Belly-breathing is free, location independent, and easy to implement.

Meditate instead of Medicate
Calm is an inside job. Give yourself the gift of serenity and start the day with ten minutes of solitude and positive energy. Think calm, measured and open-minded, and your daily activities will correspond.

Practice Self-Care
Get a massage, a mani-pedi, or a haircut. Nothing says polished and well-maintained like a sexy, healthy glow.

Eliminate fizzy drinks
That morning cup of jcoffee can jumpstart your day and provide warmth and comfort, but anything with high fructose corn syrup and 177 other ingredients will not.

Trim the Fat from Your Budget
Debt will keep you up at night and contribute to feelings of low self-worth and hopelessness. Take charge of your finances and stop spending on non-essentials. Track your daily expenses for a week or two and decide where you can cut back. Notice the items you accumulate mindlessly.

Plan a Day Trip
When you spend time in nature, you give your mind and body a much needed break from the hustle and bustle which causes you to Google things like “How to get rid of anxiety” in the first place. Chances are no matter where you live, there’s a serene, interesting and charming place within a couple hours.

Go to Bed Early
This may sound impossible if you’re accustomed to staying up late to catch up on the To-Do list. But this one’s a MUST. Sleep deprivation is a huge anxiety culprit. Inadequate shuteye can amplify the brain’s anticipatory reactions, upping overall anxiety levels, according to research

Wake up 15 Minutes Early
Like most anxious people, you’re probably rushing around in the morning and yelling at everyone in your wake, “Hurry up! We’re going to be late!” Go slowly, and set yourself up for a relaxed day ahead. If you start to worry about the To-Do list, take a deep breath and think, There is enough time.

Get Your Lavender On!
Lavender oil has many healing properties and can be used as a natural remedy to reduce anxiety and other nervous conditions. There are many ways to incorporate lavender into your calm tool kit:

Reduce Caffeine, Sugar and Processed Foods From Your Diet
Caffeine can cause heart palpitations if you ingest too much. Caffeine also can trigger panic or anxiety attacks, especially if you have an anxiety disorder. Hypoglycaemia, or low blood sugar, can also cause palpitations.

Know that Feelings Are Not Facts
One of the hardest jobs of a hypnotherapist is to convince your anxious client that the feelings of low self-worth, guilt and shame are not accurate. Negative thoughts cause negative feelings.

Challenge Negative Core Beliefs
Remember that thoughts precede feelings. Negative thoughts lead to negative emotions, which lead to negative behaviours.

Get Some Accountability
If you’re BFF with Nervous Nellie or Anxious Allen, put your keyed-up energy to good use. Vow to work on healthier ways to cope when feeling stressed together.
Attend a Social Gathering (Even If You Don’t Want To)
If you’re prone to social anxiety, it’s important to make time for socialization. It’s cool to be an introvert, but know that we live in a universe that revolves around connecting with others.

Exercise, Exercise, Exercise!
Exercise is nature’s anti-anxiety remedy. Besides clearing the mind, firing up the endorphins, and helping you sleep soundly at night, researchers have found that individuals who exercise vigorously and regularly were 25 percent less likely to develop an anxiety disorder within five years.

Accept Your Anxiety
Whether you inherited the “anxiety gene” from your parents, or your lifestyle, or both, accept your anxiety rather than fight it. It’s not about rolling over and giving up. Understand you have to work hard every day to bring calm to your environment. Remember there’s always options in life, and worse fates exist than being anxiety-sensitive. After all, when push comes to shove, at the end of the (stressed out) day, anxious people get the job done!

Schedule a Visit with a Therapist
Nobody deserves to feel bad. A qualified mental health professional is your best bet if your anxiety is unbearable.
PS. I know a good one. 🙂

www.jonadkin.com His brilliant

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These anxiety quotes not only provide inspiration,

but they give you a look into what it’s like living with anxiety and panic.

“You can’t stop the waves, but you can learn to surf.”

“Even when things are wonderful.

I’m always waiting for something horrible to happen.”

“Even the simplest task can be overwhelming at time.”

“I say “sorry” a lot, mostly because I feel everything is my fault.”

“Today I will not stress over things I can’t control.”

“I’m terrified that even if I try my hardest, I still won’t be good enough.”

“Too many of us are not living our dreams because we are living our fears.”

“When you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change.”

“You are strong for getting out of bed in the morning when it feels like hell.

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I hope you enjoyed this Blog. Please let me know if you use any of these tips. More detailed advice can be found in my book ‘Can I Change‘ available from Amazon in Paperback and Kindle versions.

Until Next time

Have a great week. Best wishes

Jon X

Have a good night.

Hi This week my blog is looking at night time Anxiety. I hope that you have found some of the tips that I offered helpful over the last few weeks. Anxiety can affect us in so many different ways and sometimes you don’t even realise that it is anxiety that you are suffering from.

Anxiety at Night.

Night time is often considered to be a time of relaxation, where we mentally unwind and prepare ourselves for sleep. However, it is still quite common to experience an anxiety attack at night.
Anxiety attacks are frightening at the best of times, but when they occur unexpectedly in the silence and darkness of night time, they can be particularly hard to endure. In theory, we are at our most relaxed when we are asleep, so it seems an unlikely time for anxiety to flare up. However, this is a common problem.

What causes anxiety attacks at night?

Night time anxiety or panic attacks, like their day time cohorts, result from the ‘fight or flight’ instinct being triggered by a perceived aggressor. In this case, the aggressor is likely to be mental angst resulting from pent up worries.
In the business of daily life they recede into the background only to rear their monstrous heads when all distractions disappear. In the stillness of the night there is no running away, and if we allow the worry monster to keep up its aggression, an anxiety attack may well ensue.
We also know that the brain does not fully switch off when we are asleep. How often does an event that occurred during the day lead to an odd dream during the night? Our brain naturally tries to process and sort out the day’s events and if these have been stressful then our dreams may well provoke anxiety too.

What can I do to stop anxiety attacks at night?

Trying to fight a night time panic attack will only make it worse. Combat this as you would an anxiety attack during the day; try to slow down, breathe deeply, relax your muscles and calm your mind with whatever thoughts or images help to make you feel safe.
The adrenaline may continue to course through your body, so it is unlikely that you will be able to just to drop off back to sleep. You may even just begin worrying about not sleeping so it can help to get up and do something else to shift your focus. Ideally, simple activities like the ironing, listening to a calming meditation, reading an inspirational or gentle book etc. or even practising yoga poses for sleep may help.
Avoid any over stimulating activity. Only once you are feel ready for sleep should you go back to bed. When you lie down, remain calm by breathing deeply in through your nose and out through your mouth; if you are breathing correctly, your abdomen (not just your chest) will be rising on an in breath and falling on an out breath.
It is possible to learn how to rationally identify and accept the anxiety attack, and allow the fear to pass. With practise of sensible tools and techniques, anxiety attacks will diminish in severity and frequency.

More Night time Tips

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Sleep by the clock

When it comes to sleep, timing is everything, as Dr Michael Breus reveals in a new ground-breaking book. Our circadian rhythm – also known as the biological clock – affects every aspect of our life, including our ability to sleep well. Going to bed at the correct bio time means you won’t lie awake feeling wired.
Wind down, not up
Sleep is a natural physiological process – but you can help it along and avoid additional anxiety by having a set wind-down routine. The goal of this is to relax your body and prime it for sleep. So if you’re going to bed at 10-11pm, set aside 30 minutes to an hour for an identical nightly pre-sleep routine. This may involve things such as taking a shower, washing your face and brushing your teeth, moisturising your face, putting on your PJs and climbing into bed with a book. Psychologist Susanna Halonen says, ‘The more identical you can make every evening, the more you train your body to prepare for sleep and the easier it will be to achieve.’
Keep a cork in it
‘Alcohol is a stimulant as well as a sedative,’ says Dr Guy Meadows of The Sleep School. ‘While many people use it to fall asleep, it is also metabolised so quickly that it can leave the body craving more.’ So when we drink alcohol close to bedtime, we are more likely to wake up in the early hours, leaving us primed for a night-time anxiety attack. As a rule of thumb, it takes an hour to process one unit of alcohol, so to be on the safe side, have a last glass of wine at 7pm if you intend to go to bed at 10pm.

Soak it up

Taking a relaxing bath can help de-clutter the mind. Try a few drops of Therapy Relaxing Bath Essence – one that contains lavender, which is a natural sleep aid. There’s an added benefit to bath time, too: the fall in body temperature we experience when we get out of the bath is a signal for the brain to start producing sleep-inducing melatonin.
Breathe and let go
Practising deep breathing can distract your mind from worries, explains Dr Ramlakhan. ‘Breathe in, hold for a few seconds and then breathe out – do this three times. Just follow the breathing as you do it.’ Breathing in this way instantly slows everything down, relaxes the mind and body, and helps channel your energy into the breathing action. The breathing will give way to the tiredness, which will overcome anxiety and help you fall asleep.
Junk the caffeine
Avoid caffeine after 2pm, suggests Will Williams. ‘Caffeine is a powerful stimulant, and it takes six hours for our body to recover from a single cup of tea or coffee. If you feel you need a hit of caffeine to get you through the afternoon, then consider learning to meditate to give you more energy throughout the day.’

That’s all for this week. I will continue with nighttime anxiety next week.

Until then have a great week and smile more. It makes you feel so much better.

Take care

Jon X

Jon Adkin BAHyp Hypnotherapist.

Extracts from ‘Can I change‘ by Jon Adkin BAHyp Available from Amazon 

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Good Afternoon…Or is it?

Hi

Well I have looked at morning anxiety, so let’s look at afternoon and evening  anxiety this week.

Anxiety is the sense of uneasiness, worry, and apprehension that most people are accustomed to experiencing every so often. For people with an anxiety disorder, these have become a way of life that need to be carefully managed in order to function and live a fulfilling life.
Whether or not you have been diagnosed with an anxiety disorder, such as panic disorder, you may find it difficult to control your anxiety or nervousness. Many people experience morning anxiety, feeling unnerved about the day ahead. Others struggle with anxiety throughout the day, feeling perturbed most of the day through. While many people will find that their evenings are filled with anxiety-related worry and tension.
Anxiety that strikes in the afternoon and evening can be incredibly bothersome as it may take away from your free time, zap your energy, and even contribute to sleep issues. For panic sufferers, increased anxiety can result in panic attacks. Fortunately, there are steps you can take to help reduce your evening anxiety, allowing for a fun and relaxing evening to a restful night.
Read on for 6 tips to that may help you overcome evening anxiety.

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Set an Intention Early:

Many of us go from one activity to the next throughout our day without really considering how we are feeling, let alone how we would like to feel. For example, do you ever come home after a long day of work and think to yourself, “I really want to relax and enjoy this evening?” Most likely you are far too busy or preoccupied to stop and ponder how you want your evening to be. However, by setting an intention early, you are more likely to get the results you want. So, for instance, if you remind yourself each day that you are determined to have a peaceful evening, you are more likely to actually experience it that way. Remembering to set an intention is easier when you mark a certain point in your day for it. For example, while driving home from work, you may be going over in your mind all the stress that you went through that day. At a certain point during your drive home, such as when you drive over a bridge or pass a certain landmark, you can set the intention to let go of work stress from that point forward and enjoy the rest of your evening.

Learn to Be Present:

Along the same lines of not being in touch with how we want to feel, many of us spend much of our time completely unaware or detached from the present moment. By making an effort to be more mindful, you may be better able to enjoy your evening. Mindfulness can prevent you from going over every worry in your head and allow you to recognize that you do not have to react to every thought that pops into your mind. Try to listen closely to your loved ones, enjoy the food you are eating, notice the beauty of the earth – these are all simple ways to push anxiety aside and become more mindful.

Leave Some Extra Transition Time:

Transition time is the time that is needed between tasks. Many of us underestimate how much transition time is needed. For instance, your evening may consist of numerous different tasks that you need to do before you go to bed.
Whatever amount of time you have allotted for each task, add a bit more time as a buffer should a task take longer than you think. That way you will avoid feeling overwhelmed, trying to cram too much in before bedtime.

Prepare for the Next Day:

Many people find it anxiety-provoking to think about all that they need to do the next day. One of the best things to do to avoid this type of anxiety is to be prepared. Get as much ready as you can, like having your clothes picked out, lunches and bags packed, and your alarm clock set. Putting a small amount of effort into preparation can help keep evening anxiety under control.

Create Some Space to Unwind:

When everything is done for the night and ready for the next day, you do need some time to relax and re energize. Set time aside each evening to simply relax and let go. You may find it nice to practice a relaxation technique, such as deep breathing, journaling, or yoga. Perhaps you find it comforting to read a book. Maybe you unwind best with a warm bath or tea.
Regardless of what brings you serenity, spend at least 10 minutes for some downtime each evening. Doing so will allow you to feel calmer throughout your evening and may even be the start for getting a good night’s rest.

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Establish a Bedtime Routine:

Establishing a bedtime routine lets you focus on taking proactive steps for yourself instead ruminating in your anxiety. Your bedtime routine may include activities such as taking a shower, brushing your teeth, changing into pyjamas, reading from an inspirational book, prayer, or listening to music.
Your bedtime routine should be established to help set you up for better rest. Don’t include any activities that may be too overstimulating, such as reading through social media or watching TV. Instead, allow your routine to be quiet, leading up to you falling asleep. This will signal to your brain that it is time to rest and will allow you to go to sleep without an upset and anxious mind.
Belly breath

Well there you are 6 tips to help you with afternoon and evening anxiety. Next week night time anxiety.

Let me know if these help.

These tips and extracts are taken from my book. ‘Can I change?‘ available from Amazon in paperback and kindle.

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Have a great week

Best wishes

Jon x

Jon Adkin BAHyp Hypnotherapist.

Morning Anxiety.

Hi.

How did you get on with the affirmations last week? The feedback that I got was all positive, so thank you for that. This week I want to blog about morning Anxiety. Yes it is a thing.

Do you ever experience racing thoughts or anxiety in the morning before you even have a chance to hit snooze on your alarm? If you do, you’re not alone.

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What is morning anxiety?

Although not a medical term, morning anxiety refers to waking up with feelings of stress and worry. If you are dealing with excessive anxiety, worry, and stress in the morning, there’s a good chance you may also have generalized anxiety.
Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is characterized by excessive and uncontrolled worry that pervades daily life and occurs frequently for at least six months. People with GAD typically worry about everyday actives such as work, money, family, and health.

What are the symptoms of morning anxiety?

The symptoms of morning anxiety often mimic those of generalized anxiety disorder. If you are struggling with anxiety upon waking, you may be experiencing: feeling restless, “on-edge,” or “wound up” irritability fatigue. Signs of a panic attack, such as tight chest, tense muscles, higher than normal heart rate, or difficulty breathing
difficulty concentrating and finding your mind goes blank
difficulty controlling the worry or nervousness.

What causes morning anxiety?

Morning anxiety can be caused by many factors that may also contribute to an anxiety disorder. Since morning anxiety is a reaction to excess stress and worries, there are several potential causes that may contribute to your symptoms.
The “stress hormone” cortisol is released by the adrenal glands in response to fear or stress. Researchers have studied the cortisol awakening response (CAR) and have found that cortisol is highest in the first hour of waking for people with an increased level of stress in their lives. This helps explain why you may experience an increase in anxiety in the morning.
What you eat and drink first thing in the morning can also contribute to higher levels of anxiety in the early hours of the day. Did you know that Caffeine and sugar can increase anxiety symptoms. But low blood sugar due to a lack of food can make anxiety symptoms worse.
If you go to bed worrying or wake up during the night with anxious thoughts, you are likely to feel anxious and concerned about your day in the morning.

How is morning anxiety treated?

Living with an anxiety disorder can feel like a never-ending cycle of worry. But it doesn’t have to take over your life. You can learn ways to cope with your symptoms. Some of the more common ways to treat morning anxiety include:

Lifestyle Changes.
Many lifestyle changes can help you manage morning anxiety, including:
getting enough sleep
limiting alcohol and caffeine (both can trigger anxiety and panic attacks)
eating a healthy diet that limits processed food and sugar
reducing stress at work and home.
There are also self-care strategies you can use right when you wake up feeling anxious. This includes:
Physical activity. Exercise is one of the best things you can do for yourself in the morning, especially if you are dealing with an excessive amount of worry when you wake up. Any physical activity, such as taking a walk, can:
lift your mood
reduce anxiety symptoms
improve your body’s ability to handle stress
help you relax
Aim to exercise at least five days per week for 30–45 minutes each session.

Deep breathing exercises

Deep breathing done first thing in the morning can help take the focus off of your negative and anxious thoughts and turn your focus and energy toward your body.

Challenging negative thoughts.

If you wake up with negative thoughts about your day (often called “awfulizing”) challenge them and focus on what you can control. You can keep a journal by your bed and write down what you are grateful for. It’s also a good idea to list at least three things you are looking forward to.

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Don’t fight it.

If you’re new to these techniques and you’re finding that managing morning anxiety is a lot harder than you thought, try setting a worry timer. Give yourself a time limit of 10 minutes to experience those feelings. When the timer goes off, move on to your self-care strategies. Though you can’t expect to simply “turn off” your anxiety, this approach allows you to acknowledge your worry and gives you a concrete point at which to move on to self-care.
Even though the symptoms of morning anxiety can feel overwhelming and permanent, they are highly treatable. When you combine professional treatment along with the self-care strategies listed above, you can experience relief from the racing thoughts and worry that invade your mind.

In conclusion for mornings

Start a morning routine.
When I started an effective morning routine and stuck to it, I was able to massively reduce my anxiety. In addition, it also helped with my productivity, energy, relationships, and a host of other areas of my life. It really was life-changing.
10 Things You Can Do to Naturally Heal Your Anxiety
Wake Up Early : According to Hannah Hepworth, an expert on natural anxiety relief, “when you wake up early you can have plenty of time to get where you need to go. Instead of rushing and yelling…you can work calmly.”
Make Your Bed : The reason making your bed is so powerful is that it allows you to successfully complete a task first thing in the morning, which then builds momentum to continue doing more for the rest of the day.
Repeat your daily affirmation : If you can look in a mirror, smile and say your daily affirmation. Say it with meaning and belief.
Take a Cold Shower : This sounds awful. In fact, when I first heard about it I didn’t try it for months because I didn’t think it could help and I loathed the idea of taking a freezing, cold shower. However, after 3-months of consistently taking a cold shower every morning, I can ensure you the benefits are enormous. The easiest recipe to get the psychological lift is by taking a cold shower for 2 to 3 minutes once or twice daily, preceded by a five-minute gradual adaptation to the temperature (i.e. start your shower hot and then finish it with 2–3 minutes of pure icy goodness). Only taking a cold shower can strengthen your body’s parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems, increase proper circulation of blood through your body, and contract your muscles to eliminate toxins and poisonous wastes.

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Coffee, Tea, or Your Breakfast Drink of Choice : Until recently, my mornings would always start with a cup of coffee. I have been consuming the beverage ever since I can remember, and I never wanted to lose that, but there came a point where I knew that healing my anxiety was much more important than the benefits of coffee. So I went cold turkey. Give it a try, but leave your phone at home. Just embrace your surrounds and be grateful that you woke up this morning.
Brain Dump at Desk : “Could bitching and moaning on paper for 5 minutes each day change your life? As crazy as it may seem, I believe the answer is yes.” -Tim Ferriss
Gratitude : The key here is not to repeat that you are grateful for your family, life. The key is to focus on being aware of the smaller things in life that you would miss if you were gone. This is a very pow-erful practice . Dr. Emmons, a gratitude researcher, confirms that practicing gratitude daily can reduce anxiety and depression.
The Morning Three
1. Affirmations—By stating three affirmations in the morning I am able to put myself into a charged state. It may seem strange, but it has been hugely beneficial to my mental state.
2. What do I get to enjoy today—By starting my day thinking about what I get to enjoy today, I put my mind into a positive mode and trigger my brain to see the upside of the day.
3. Daily Intention — I start out each day with intention. Whether it’s as simple as “I will be present today” or “I will choose to see the beauty in everything that happens to me today.” It doesn’t really matter, but I have found it extremely helpful for lowering my daily anxiety to be intentional about what I want my day’s purpose to be,

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Three Most Important Tasks that need to get done Even a basic plan of attack for your day can drastically reduce your anxiety by decreasing the cognitive load that comes with increased decision making. Each morning we wake up with a finite amount of brain power and every decision we make detracts from it. By having a basic structure that decreases the number of decisions you have to make about what you are going to do next, you will be able to take control of your day and calm your restless mind.”
1. What task, if completed successfully, will make all of the others obsolete?
2. What task do I have the most anxiety/fear about?
3. What task will move me closest to accomplishing my number 1 goal?
Deep Work: Do all of the above. Make it work for you.
I understand we all have different schedules and responsibilities, but if we want to overcome anxiety and move our goals forward truly we must protect our mornings. If we don’t take control of our mornings, something else will.

Hope that made sense. Until next time.

Have a great week

Jon X

These recent blogs are taken from my paperback Can I Change? Available from Amazon in Paperback or Kindle version.

Jon Adkin BAHyp Hypnotherapist