What can you do to help yourself During Lockdown?

This lockdown seems so much harder. The first one we had the nice weather, so we could sit in the garden and be active outside. Then the second one weather wasn’t great but at least we had Christmas to look forward to. However this one is not so good. and I’m not gonna be mean and list why, because this lockdown is affecting so many people in different ways, but what can we do to help ourselves and our mental health?

Well here are some tips that I have passed on to my clients.

Taking care of your mind as well as your body is really important if you are staying at home because of coronavirus. You may feel worried or anxious about your finances, your health or those close to you. Perhaps you feel bored, frustrated or lonely. It’s important to remember that it’s OK to feel this way and that everyone reacts differently.

Remember, for most of us, these feelings will pass. Staying at home may be difficult, but you’re helping to protect yourself and others by doing it.

There are things you can do now to help you keep on top of your mental wellbeing and cope with how you may feel if you’re staying at home. Make sure you get further support if you feel you need it.

Don’t be a victim of this lockdown.

Stay connected with others
Maintaining healthy relationships with people you trust is important for your mental wellbeing. Think about ways to stay in touch with friends and family – by phone, messaging, video calls or social media.

Talk about your worries
It’s normal to feel a bit worried, scared or helpless about the current situation. Remember: it is OK to share your concerns with others you trust – and doing so may help them too. If you cannot speak to someone you know or if doing so has not helped, there are plenty of helplines you can try instead.

Look after your body
Our physical health has a big impact on how we feel. At times like these, it can be easy to fall into unhealthy patterns of behaviour that end up making you feel worse. Try to eat healthy, NO comfort eating,or picking out of boredom. well-balanced meals, drink enough water and exercise regularly. Avoid smoking, drugs or drinking too much alcohol.

If you are staying at home, you could try exercising indoors, as there are lots of free online classes. Or try an easy 10-minute home workout.

Stay on top of difficult feelings
Concern about the coronavirus outbreak and your health is normal. However, some people may experience intense anxiety that can affect their day-to-day life. Help yourself by staying off social media and reading all the nonsense that is being posted. Limit you news intake to perhaps the main evening bulletin. Try to focus on the things you can control, such as how you act, who you speak to and where you get information from.

It’s fine to acknowledge that some things are outside of your control, but if constant thoughts about the situation are making you feel anxious or overwhelmed, try some ideas to help manage your anxiety.


Some top tips

Top tips to cope with anxiety

Understand your anxiety
Try keeping a diary of what you are doing and how you feel at different times to help identify what’s affecting you and what you need to take action on.

Challenge your anxious thoughts
Tackling unhelpful thoughts is one of the best things we can do to feel less anxious. Watch the video to find out more.

Make time for worries
If your worry feels overwhelming and takes over your day, setting specific “worry time” to go through your concerns each day can help you to focus on other things. Watch the video for more advice.

Shift your focus
Some people find relaxation, mindfulness or breathing exercises helpful. They reduce tension and focus our awareness on the present moment.

Face the things you want to avoid
It’s easy to avoid situations, or rely on habits that make us feel safer, but these can keep anxiety going. By slowly building up time in worrying situations, anxious feelings will gradually reduce and you will see these situations are OK.

Get to grips with the problem
When you’re feeling stressed or anxious, it can help to use a problem-solving technique to identify some solutions. This can make the challenges you’re facing feel more manageable.


Carry on doing things you enjoy
If we are feeling worried, anxious, lonely or low, we may stop doing things we usually enjoy. Make an effort to focus on your favourite hobby if it is something you can still do at home. Or start a new hobby: read, write, do crosswords or jigsaws, bake, or try drawing and painting. Whatever it is, find something that works for you.

If you cannot think of anything you like doing, try learning something new at home. There are lots of free tutorials and courses online. You can still stay social at home by joining others online: book clubs, pub quizzes and music concerts are just a few of the things to try.

Take time to relax
This can help with difficult emotions and worries, and improve our wellbeing. Relaxation techniques can also help deal with feelings of anxiety. Make sure you take ME time. Even if it’s just a coffee on your own or a 30 minute time out to read a chapter of a book. just you and some peace.

Get good sleep
Good-quality sleep makes a big difference to how we feel, so it’s important to get enough. Try to maintain your regular sleeping pattern and stick to good sleep practices.

“Don’t be a victim of this lockdown. Be a survivor in fact, focus on you and emerge a stronger, healthier and happier person.”

I can help. Message me

Until next time.

Stay safe. Stay healthy.

Jon

Hypnotherapy in Suffolk, Essex and Cambridge. and online via Zoom

Jon Adkin Author of ‘Can I Change?’ Available from Amazon. and 100 days in isolation. A collection of funny original images of one mans decent into comic madness during lockdown

Find me on You TubeFacebook, Instagram. and now TikTok.

They didn’t teach us this!

So I trained to become a hypnotherapist. I worked really hard, I learnt loads. The history and thinking behind my new skill. Lots of different techniques and I worked with case studies to perfect my art. I qualified, my door was open now bring on the clients. Hello I said bring on the clients.

Oh hang on, we have to find our own clients. They didn’t tell us that bit. How many therapists feel like this? Not just therapists, but anyone that offers a service and aim to get business across social media.

Now, I am one of the lucky ones because having an IT background I understand about algorithms and how they work ( well a lot of the time I do). However so many therapists don’t have an IT knowledge. Where does that leave them?

We ask friends and family to like and share our page, which they do, but is there really any prospect of them becoming a paying client? The answer is no not really. They are showing their support but that isn’t going to pay the bills. So now what? Well you have to start posting regularly on your chosen platforms, but what do you post? how do you get likes? Will they share my post? Do I need to pay for likes? HELP!

I need help.

Help is around, but what I have found that there are a lot of marketeers trying to sell you the same package that they sell to a plumber, a car salesman, a painter and decorator. what do they really know about the therapy business? As therapists we face problems over and above other services.

  • People are scared to like posts as it shows their name and their friends may notice.
  • Therapy of any sort still has a stigma attached to it so people don’t tend to share.
  • What we do is all a bit Woo Woo. According to some. We know it isn’t, we know it works. but how do we prove that if we can’t attract clients?
  • The chances of your post getting in front of a client at exactly the right moment is very very slim.
  • People don’t like admitting they have a problem so are reluctant to ask for help.
  • The list goes on.

So what can we do. Ahh. Well that’s where I can help. You see I’ve only been full time just over 3 years now but in that time I have been lucky enough to stay busy and have a constant flow of clients. I have been able to do this as I understand how to get the best out of Facebook, Instagram and social media in general, and the best thing is that I did it on a zero budget.

So what I have done is compiled a 50+ page manual aimed at therapists, but will help anyone that offers a service to raise their awareness on social media, and in doing so will get your name out there and keep it out there until your client is ready, and when they are ready they contact you and become a new paying client.

Perhaps you may find that missing piece.

I will be selling this manual for just £49.00 but it is filled with tips and advice on how to post, what to post, when to post and about creating an identity on social media. I let you know the costly mistakes that I made, so that you don’t make them and I also point you in the direction of some excellent free software or apps that are my go to when posting.

What Can Social Media Do For You?

A helpful manual for therapists and small business to create a better presences on social media. SEPTEMBER SPECIAL OFFER JUST £49.00

£49.00

You do not need a PayPal account to pay via Paypal.

I’m not going to promise you a major influx of clients or that you will be earning £50k plus by Christmas but as long as you make some of the suggested tweaks, and make it your own, you will see a rise in your social media presence.

If you are reading this and want to know more please feel free to email me at jadkin.bahyp@gmail.com or see my Facebook page I’m doing this to help and support therapists and small businesses that have just survived a very tough time. As I say I’m not a marketeer, I’m just someone who understands what you are going through.

I want to turn on that light at the end of the tunnel for you.

Until next week, or possibly the week after 🙂

Have a great week or two.

Take care and stay safe.

Jon X

Hypnotherapy in Suffolk, Essex and Cambridge. and online via Zoom

Jon Adkin Author of ‘Can I Change?’ Available from Amazon. and 100 days in isolation. A collection of funny original images of one mans decent into comic madness during lockdown

Find me on You TubeFacebook and Instagram.

Are you ready to leave lockdown?

Hi, Welcome to this weeks blog.

I opened my doors for one to one last week, working within the Government guidelines of social distancing. The response has been great, and I thank anyone who I have seen since I opened.

What I have noticed from the messages and the phone conversations that I’ve received this week is that there seems to be a whole new lot of problems that have arisen because of Covid-19. I think because of the lockdown new issues have raised their heads, some serious some not so serious. The not so serious were things like, My next door neighbours cat meows too loud, or I slept for 3 hours in the afternoon and I can’t get to sleep at night, and many more. What the lockdown has done is heightened senses. We have become more aware of things going on around us. We have also got out of routines, So taking a 3 hour sleep in the afternoon is of course going to disrupt your usual sleep pattern.

We are slowly coming out of lockdown, so perhaps next week you need to start getting back into a routine. You could start by getting out of your PJ’s or your trackies. Start dressing normally again.

Reintroduce your old routine 

If you’re preparing to start going back into the office or do the school run, it’s a good idea to start easing back into your old routine now. Set your alarm for the time you would normally get up and go to bed at the time you did pre-lockdown. 

If you have a household with children, that means getting the whole family back onto this timezone too. Go through the motions of your old routine too – get showered and dressed and do your hair as if you were going into the office. 

‘Also – ensure you create a sense of weekdays and weekends by focussing on chores and work during the week and relaxation time for weekends – just as you used to do. This all helps to create a sense of confidence that we are ready to readjust and resets our body clocks in preparation for the event.

Suggest a catch up on Zoom

Suggest a Zoom work catch-up 

One of the most common anxieties I hear from people in my practice, is the thought of going back to work and having face to face meetings or social interaction

To help reduce anxiety around this, reach out to work colleagues – FaceTime them – ahead of going back to work. This will significantly help to alleviate some of your fears as you reconnect with them and you’ll feel that much more confident about your long-awaited physical interaction with them. 

‘You could even suggest a Zoom call with a group of colleagues to create a sense of togetherness and establish your sense of community.

Re-introduce your work wardrobe 

The clothes we wear affect our mood, confidence, attitudes and even the way we behave and interact with people. So now – more than ever – think of this as your psychological armour for        re-entering the world. 

‘Many of us have been living in a uniform of comfy sweats and elasticated waist trousers for what feels like an eternity but it’s time to go through your wardrobe and create your capsule ‘back to the world’ key looks.  Even invest in a few new pieces if it helps you feel good. Not only will this mentally empower you, it removes a huge amount of pressure and stress when the day finally comes – it’s one less thing to think about. And simplicity is key in reducing anxiety.

Start cutting down now.

Reduce your screen time 

The trepidation and confusion caused by information overload is a huge contributor towards anxiety levels. As you prepare to go back into the outside world, take stock and account of the amount of screen time you spend browsing social media and news sites. 

Many of us have increased our intake of social media sites and that has caused a massive increase in anxiety rates. Children also need to be told not to spend so much time on You Tube and Tik Tok etc. If you start to reduce their viewing times now, it won’t come as so much of a shock when normality finally returns. Limit your own screen time to once or twice daily and be aware of the people or information sources that create a feeling of dread – avoid these. Especially on days when you’re feeling high levels of anxiety.

If you find zoom chats exhausting you’re not alone. Video calls can be harder to navigate in many ways than face to face interactions, because we are so focused on seeing our own face. 

‘It can also feel rather overwhelming when everyone is talking at the same time. Instead of solely relying on Zoom, get back into the habit of speaking to people you care about on the phone.’

Strike up a conversation with a stranger

Walk your dog or your child where you know you’ll find other people, such as in the park, whilst maintaining social distancing. Give yourself an exercise each day to strike up a conversation with someone you don’t know – even from a few metres away. 

‘Having been locked up at home for weeks, we are used to giving people a wide berth and it’s easy to feel a sense of fear and mistrust when we see someone new. Get back into the habit of smiling and making eye contact, rather than leaping into the nearest hedge when someone approaches.’

Another option is to set up a chair by your front door and talk to people as they pass. Setting up a chair at your front door with a cuppa or a glass of wine and chat to people walking past, can be very enjoyable, Connecting with people, from the safety of your garden or balcony, or even an open window is a good first step to re-socialising, plus you may even make friends new people in your neighbourhood. 

Although it may feel strange at first, don’t focus on your own feelings of awkwardness. Instead, focus on the fact that your friendliness could brighten up someone else’s day.

And finally for this week.

Equip yourself with a mask and podcast for the first commute 

‘It’s important to differentiate that, for most people, the fear of going outside of the house is not rooted in the action of going outside in itself – it’s the fear of becoming infected.

‘Naturally, the idea of boarding public transport or a cramped commuter train where we are not in control of social distancing nor has it been effectively enforced, is enough to send us over the edge and into panic attack territory. It’s so important to gear yourself up for this mentally if you have no choice but to use public transport. Beyond the basics of equipping yourself with a protective mask, gloves and hand sanitiser, download your favourite podcasts or playlist that helps to relax and transport you to a place of calm or take a book to read.

I wish you all a safe and health week. Until next time

Take care, Best wishes

Jon X

Hypnotherapy in Suffolk, Essex and Cambridge.

Jon Adkin Author of ‘Can I Change?’ Available from Amazon.

Find me on You TubeFacebook and Instagram.

Are you positive?

H. Welcome to this weeks blog. All about positive thinking. So my first question to you is do you see yourself as a positive thinker? Do you see the problem or do you look for the solution?

You know the old question. Is your glass half-empty or half-full? How you answer this age-old question about positive thinking may reflect your outlook on life, your attitude toward yourself, and whether you’re optimistic or pessimistic — and it may even affect your health.

Indeed, some studies show that personality traits such as optimism and pessimism can affect many areas of your health and well-being. The positive thinking that usually comes with optimism is a key part of effective stress management. And effective stress management is associated with many health benefits. If you tend to be pessimistic, don’t despair — you can learn positive thinking skills.

Understanding positive thinking and self-talk

Positive thinking doesn’t mean that you keep your head in the sand and ignore life’s less pleasant situations. Positive thinking just means that you approach unpleasantness in a more positive and productive way. You think the best is going to happen, not the worst.

Positive thinking often starts with self-talk. Self-talk is the endless stream of unspoken thoughts that run through your head. These automatic thoughts can be positive or negative. Some of your self-talk comes from logic and reason. Other self-talk may arise from misconceptions that you create because of lack of information.

If the thoughts that run through your head are mostly negative, your outlook on life is more likely pessimistic. If your thoughts are mostly positive, you’re likely an optimist — someone who practices positive thinking.

Did you know there are health benefits to positive thinking.

The health benefits of positive thinking

Researchers continue to explore the effects of positive thinking and optimism on health. Health benefits that positive thinking may provide include:

  • Increased life span
  • Lower rates of depression
  • Lower levels of distress
  • Greater resistance to the common cold
  • Better psychological and physical well-being
  • Better cardiovascular health and reduced risk of death from cardiovascular disease
  • Better coping skills during hardships and times of stress

It’s unclear why people who engage in positive thinking experience these health benefits. One theory is that having a positive outlook enables you to cope better with stressful situations, which reduces the harmful health effects of stress on your body.

It’s also thought that positive and optimistic people tend to live healthier lifestyles — they get more physical activity, follow a healthier diet, and don’t smoke or drink alcohol in excess.

Stop thinking those negative thoughts.

Identifying negative thinking

Not sure if your self-talk is positive or negative? Some common forms of negative self-talk include:

  • Filtering. You magnify the negative aspects of a situation and filter out all of the positive ones. For example, you had a great day at work. You completed your tasks ahead of time and were complimented for doing a speedy and thorough job. That evening, you focus only on your plan to do even more tasks and forget about the compliments you received.
  • Personalizing. When something bad occurs, you automatically blame yourself. For example, you hear that an evening out with friends is canceled, and you assume that the change in plans is because no one wanted to be around you.
  • Catastrophizing. You automatically anticipate the worst. The drive-through coffee shop gets your order wrong and you automatically think that the rest of your day will be a disaster.
  • Polarizing. You see things only as either good or bad. There is no middle ground. You feel that you have to be perfect or you’re a total failure.

Focusing on positive thinking

You can learn to turn negative thinking into positive thinking. The process is simple, but it does take time and practice — you’re creating a new habit, after all. Here are some ways to think and behave in a more positive and optimistic way:

  • Identify areas to change. If you want to become more optimistic and engage in more positive thinking, first identify areas of your life that you usually think negatively about, whether it’s work, your daily commute or a relationship. You can start small by focusing on one area to approach in a more positive way.
  • Check yourself. Periodically during the day, stop and evaluate what you’re thinking. If you find that your thoughts are mainly negative, try to find a way to put a positive spin on them.
  • Be open to humor. Give yourself permission to smile or laugh, especially during difficult times. Seek humor in everyday happenings. When you can laugh at life, you feel less stressed.
  • Follow a healthy lifestyle. Aim to exercise for about 30 minutes on most days of the week. You can also break it up into 10-minute chunks of time during the day. Exercise can positively affect mood and reduce stress. Follow a healthy diet to fuel your mind and body. And learn techniques to manage stress.
  • Surround yourself with positive people. Make sure those in your life are positive, supportive people you can depend on to give helpful advice and feedback. Negative people may increase your stress level and make you doubt your ability to manage stress in healthy ways.
  • Practice positive self-talk. Start by following one simple rule: Don’t say anything to yourself that you wouldn’t say to anyone else. Be gentle and encouraging with yourself. If a negative thought enters your mind, evaluate it rationally and respond with affirmations of what is good about you. Think about things you’re thankful for in your life.
Let those Negative thoughts just pass on by and hold on to the positive thoughts.

Here are some examples of negative self-talk and how you can apply a positive thinking twist to them:

Negative self-talkPositive thinking
I’ve never done it before.It’s an opportunity to learn something new.
It’s too complicated.I’ll tackle it from a different angle.
I don’t have the resources.Necessity is the mother of invention.
I’m too lazy to get this done.I wasn’t able to fit it into my schedule, but I can re-examine some priorities.
There’s no way it will work.I can try to make it work.
It’s too radical a change.Let’s take a chance.
No one bothers to communicate with me.I’ll see if I can open the channels of communication.
I’m not going to get any better at this.I’ll give it another try.

I’m going to carry this on next week talking more about positive thinking.

Have a good week and think positively especially about yourself. Treat yourself as you would your best friend.

Until next week.

Jon X

Jon Adkin BAHyp Hypnotherapist

www,jonadkin.com Based in Haverhill Suffolk, Serving, Suffolk, Essex and Cambridge.

Follow Jon on Facebook by clicking here.

Subscribe to Jon’s YouTube channel here.

Don’t let your thoughts ruin your Christmas.

Hi. Welcome back to my last post of 2019. What a year it’s been. Ups and downs and a few surprises thrown in. However with all that I survived mine and you survived yours if you are reading this. so well done. The good bits hold in your heart the bad bits let them go. if you made mistakes, learn from them. if they weren’t your problem then don’t worry about it and just move on.

For my last blog I want to conclude my posts on  self confidence.

I am a great believer in positive thinking and self belief and daily affirmations have helped me so much. Remember what we say to ourselves we believe, our mind believes so think positive and you will stay positive.

Here are some quotes and affirmations that I would like to share with you for Christmas.

Self-Confidence Quotes

One important key to success is self-confidence. An important key to self-confidence is preparation.

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Nothing builds self-esteem and self-confidence like accomplishment.

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Don’t let others put thoughts into your mind that takes away your self-confidence.
To excel at the highest level – or any level,

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you need to believe in yourself,

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Always be yourself and have faith in yourself.

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Love yourself first and everything else falls into line. You really have to love yourself to get anything done in this world.

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Just believe in yourself. Even if you don’t, pretend that you do and, at some point, you will.

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Confidence comes not from always being right but from not fearing to be wrong.

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Doubt kills more dreams than failure ever will.

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As soon as you trust yourself, you will know how to live.

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Confidence is when you believe in yourself and your abilities, arrogance is when you think you are better than others and act accordingly.

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The most beautiful thing you can wear is confidence .

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Why should we worry about what others think of us, do we have more confidence in their opinions than we do our own?

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To establish true self-esteem we must concentrate on our successes and forget about the failures and the negatives in our lives.

Daily Affirmations

I believe in me.

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I’m getting stronger every day.

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I can do this.

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I am who I want to be

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I know my worth

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I’ve decided I’m good enough.

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I have the strength to change my story.

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I deserve to be happy and loved.

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I accept myself unconditionally.

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I love myself, and I accept myself as I am.

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I am confident.

When you get up in the morning choose an affirmation and smile at yourself in the mirror and say it to yourself. It’s a simple and powerful way to start your day.

Merry Christmas and I sincerely wish you all the very best for 2020.

See you in January. Have a good one.

Jon XX

These last few posts have been taken from my book ‘Can I Change?‘ Available from Amazon .It makes an ideal stocking filler.