What can you do to help yourself During Lockdown?

This lockdown seems so much harder. The first one we had the nice weather, so we could sit in the garden and be active outside. Then the second one weather wasn’t great but at least we had Christmas to look forward to. However this one is not so good. and I’m not gonna be mean and list why, because this lockdown is affecting so many people in different ways, but what can we do to help ourselves and our mental health?

Well here are some tips that I have passed on to my clients.

Taking care of your mind as well as your body is really important if you are staying at home because of coronavirus. You may feel worried or anxious about your finances, your health or those close to you. Perhaps you feel bored, frustrated or lonely. It’s important to remember that it’s OK to feel this way and that everyone reacts differently.

Remember, for most of us, these feelings will pass. Staying at home may be difficult, but you’re helping to protect yourself and others by doing it.

There are things you can do now to help you keep on top of your mental wellbeing and cope with how you may feel if you’re staying at home. Make sure you get further support if you feel you need it.

Don’t be a victim of this lockdown.

Stay connected with others
Maintaining healthy relationships with people you trust is important for your mental wellbeing. Think about ways to stay in touch with friends and family – by phone, messaging, video calls or social media.

Talk about your worries
It’s normal to feel a bit worried, scared or helpless about the current situation. Remember: it is OK to share your concerns with others you trust – and doing so may help them too. If you cannot speak to someone you know or if doing so has not helped, there are plenty of helplines you can try instead.

Look after your body
Our physical health has a big impact on how we feel. At times like these, it can be easy to fall into unhealthy patterns of behaviour that end up making you feel worse. Try to eat healthy, NO comfort eating,or picking out of boredom. well-balanced meals, drink enough water and exercise regularly. Avoid smoking, drugs or drinking too much alcohol.

If you are staying at home, you could try exercising indoors, as there are lots of free online classes. Or try an easy 10-minute home workout.

Stay on top of difficult feelings
Concern about the coronavirus outbreak and your health is normal. However, some people may experience intense anxiety that can affect their day-to-day life. Help yourself by staying off social media and reading all the nonsense that is being posted. Limit you news intake to perhaps the main evening bulletin. Try to focus on the things you can control, such as how you act, who you speak to and where you get information from.

It’s fine to acknowledge that some things are outside of your control, but if constant thoughts about the situation are making you feel anxious or overwhelmed, try some ideas to help manage your anxiety.


Some top tips

Top tips to cope with anxiety

Understand your anxiety
Try keeping a diary of what you are doing and how you feel at different times to help identify what’s affecting you and what you need to take action on.

Challenge your anxious thoughts
Tackling unhelpful thoughts is one of the best things we can do to feel less anxious. Watch the video to find out more.

Make time for worries
If your worry feels overwhelming and takes over your day, setting specific “worry time” to go through your concerns each day can help you to focus on other things. Watch the video for more advice.

Shift your focus
Some people find relaxation, mindfulness or breathing exercises helpful. They reduce tension and focus our awareness on the present moment.

Face the things you want to avoid
It’s easy to avoid situations, or rely on habits that make us feel safer, but these can keep anxiety going. By slowly building up time in worrying situations, anxious feelings will gradually reduce and you will see these situations are OK.

Get to grips with the problem
When you’re feeling stressed or anxious, it can help to use a problem-solving technique to identify some solutions. This can make the challenges you’re facing feel more manageable.


Carry on doing things you enjoy
If we are feeling worried, anxious, lonely or low, we may stop doing things we usually enjoy. Make an effort to focus on your favourite hobby if it is something you can still do at home. Or start a new hobby: read, write, do crosswords or jigsaws, bake, or try drawing and painting. Whatever it is, find something that works for you.

If you cannot think of anything you like doing, try learning something new at home. There are lots of free tutorials and courses online. You can still stay social at home by joining others online: book clubs, pub quizzes and music concerts are just a few of the things to try.

Take time to relax
This can help with difficult emotions and worries, and improve our wellbeing. Relaxation techniques can also help deal with feelings of anxiety. Make sure you take ME time. Even if it’s just a coffee on your own or a 30 minute time out to read a chapter of a book. just you and some peace.

Get good sleep
Good-quality sleep makes a big difference to how we feel, so it’s important to get enough. Try to maintain your regular sleeping pattern and stick to good sleep practices.

“Don’t be a victim of this lockdown. Be a survivor in fact, focus on you and emerge a stronger, healthier and happier person.”

I can help. Message me

Until next time.

Stay safe. Stay healthy.

Jon

Hypnotherapy in Suffolk, Essex and Cambridge. and online via Zoom

Jon Adkin Author of ‘Can I Change?’ Available from Amazon. and 100 days in isolation. A collection of funny original images of one mans decent into comic madness during lockdown

Find me on You TubeFacebook, Instagram. and now TikTok.

Lockdown 2 Survival tips

So lockdown 2 has begun. Or Jamanji level 11 2020 As I like to call it.

We have survived it once we can survive it again but this time with an added strength because we know that we can do it.
Since it was announced I was looking for clarification as to whether I would be able to stay open and offer support to those that are anxious about lockdown, I was going to offer online sessions anyway but I do have a lot of clients where they prefer face to face rather than online. I understand that. I also understand how this new lockdown could be a tipping point for many. It’s colder, so we are not so quick to go out and do our daily walk. The days are so much shorter, and that means that you sit down and overthink so much more. So the lockdown take a different shape this time around.

I’m Open


Anyway I was given the all clear to stay open with guidelines of course, but at least people will know that there is help out their for them if not from me, from one of my very capable friends. So don’t let this lockdown get into your head. You are in control of your thoughts so keep them positive ones.


I’ve put together tips to survive this lockdown below. Some are mine, some are ones that I thought were great suggestions from various websites. As long as they help you I’m happy.

  • Keep to a routine – everyone is in unfamiliar territory with the current pandemic, so
    keeping some normality and routine is vital. Try to get up and go to bed at your normal time.
    Getting enough sleep, eating regularly and keeping hydrated will help optimise your health to
    fight the bugs off. Children can be particularly sensitive to upheaval, so try and make their day
    structured with set ground rules/boundaries, and stick to them.
  • Variety is the spice of life – A variety of activities will help stave off any boredom, you
    don’t have to just resort to box-sets and daytime TV. Gardening is a great activity, and fun to
    do with kids. Giving it a good old clean up at this time of year is ideal and if the kids are helping all our creepy crawly friends are out in force. You don’t even have to have a garden, as many things can be grown easily on a window sill. Local garden centres are also offering free home delivery. Reading a book or keeping your mind active with puzzles/quizzes/crosswords etc. are easy activities to get
    started with, and there are loads of activities available online, for adults and kids, that have
    been made free during the lockdown. Why not try to learn a new language, a musical instrument
    or broaden your horizons with a free opera broadcast?
  • Regular Exercise & fresh air – exercise is often the first thing to go out of the window
    when our daily routine is disrupted. Exercise not only keeps us physically well, but is also a great
    way to de-stress and protect our mental health. It doesn’t have to be anything fancy, if you are
    stuck indoors there are lots of HIIT (high intensity interval training) sessions you can do
    quickly, or do something simple like walking up and down the stairs a few times. Anything is
    better than nothing. If you can get outside even better, 30 minutes of a brisk walk/run/bike is
    plenty (maintaining your social distancing!).
    If you are lucky enough to have your own garden or outside space make the most of it if the weather is nice. If you don’t, or if you struggle to get out, then open the window and let some fresh air in.
    If it’s a clear night why not go out for a walk in the evening and do a bit of stargazing?
Don’t start snacking
  • Healthy eating – like exercise, when our routine is disrupted or we get stressed, eating
    habits can go to pot. Try and eat regular meals. Avoid too much snacking, or if you do, try to
    choose healthy snacks like nuts or fruit. Use it as an opportunity to get adventurous with
    cooking, and learn some new culinary skills. If you have kids at home, baking or cooking is a fun
    activity to do together and educational for them too. There are loads of recipes ideas online if
    you need them.
  • Limit social media & news feeds – it’s great to stay informed, but getting obsessive and
    tuning in all the time can be detrimental. If you are finding your anxiety ramping up, try to stay
    away and limit access to once a day. Also make sure you get your info from reputable sources,
    have a healthy scepticism of anything you read online or on social media. If you are not sure,
    look on official websites (NHS, Gov.uk) or ask your friendly GP (practice website or e-consult if
    available).
  • Help neighbours – elderly, unwell, or immobile neighbours are going to be at greater risk
    during this period. If you have time why not give them a call to check on how they are doing,
    and if you are doing an essential shopping run ask them if they need anything. Many communities
    are setting up formal volunteering groups which you could get involved in.
  • Stay connected, make the most of technology – we are fortunate to live in an age
    where there is a huge number of ways to keep connected. Just because you are in isolation
    doesn’t mean you can’t keep in contact via telephone or video call. Many methods offer group
    chats/calls so you can get the extended family all together, or your kids can keep in contact
    with their friends. Facetime, Skype, WhatsApp, Zoom are a good starting point.
Keep in touch.
  • Support local businesses – restaurants, bars and shops are going to take a big hit in the
    coming weeks, and without support may struggle to keep afloat. If they continue to offer home
    delivery or takeaway why not treat yourself now and again and support your local community.
    We will miss them when they are gone if we don’t!
  • Look after you mental health – as mentioned already, routine, exercise and avoiding too
    much social media/news can all help safeguard your mental health. However, if you are starting
    to struggle there is help out there for you. Calm and Headspace are great resources for
    anxiety which usually need a subscription but currently are offering free content. Your GP can
    also help or signpost you if needed, and there are many other charitable organisations that
    offer support online or by telephone*.
  • Relax, give yourself a break – particularly relevant if you are trying to juggle working
    from home I would hope that most employers will be supportive and understand that productivity just isn’t going to be the same in the current situation. So cut yourself some slack and don’t put yourself under too much pressure – everyone needs a bit of me time and a break.
    And finally…remember this isn’t going to last forever. Stay safe, be kind and supportive to
    each other and we will come out of this stronger.

Until next week, or possibly the week after 

Have a great week or two.

Take care and stay safe.

Jon X

Hypnotherapy in Suffolk, Essex and Cambridge. and online via Zoom

Jon Adkin Author of ‘Can I Change?’ Available from Amazon. and 100 days in isolation. A collection of funny original images of one mans decent into comic madness during lockdown

Find me on You TubeFacebook and Instagram.

Laughter really is the best medicine.

Hi, Welcome to this weeks blog.
I said a few weeks ago that I handled the current Covid-19 situation with humour. I knew a lot of people were worried and even scared, but I felt that the last thing they needed was for someone to keep reminding them that they were feeling anxious or stressed. I wanted to take their mind off of the situation so each day I posted an original funny picture or a corny gag to make people start their day with a smile. I didn’t take the decision lightly as I knew that people all around the world were suffering or sadly dying. However there was nothing that I could do to stop that, but I could make people smile and take their mind off of the situation, even if only for a short time. Turns out I was right. I continued to study the effects of laughter and I have compiled this list to show you just how much it helps.
They say that laughter is “the best medicine,” and as it turns out, there is some scientific truth to this assertion. Humour-associated laughter has numerous health benefits, so here are 10 reasons you should laugh it up.


LAUGHTER IS A SIGN OF GOODWILL TO ALL OTHERS.


Laughter may be unique to humans. Why do we do it? According to a 2010 study in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, laughter and smiling are generally intended as a message of good will. The authors extrapolate that there is a similar function in primates, who use facial expressions with bared teeth to suggest friendliness and sociability. They write, “Because some forms of smiling are voluntary and easily faked, laughter, which requires a more synergetic contraction of the wider musculature, is believed to have evolved in humans to express a secure, safe message to others.”

Day 5 I started going nuts.


LAUGHTER MAY REDUCE YOUR BLOOD PRESSURE.

High blood pressure (hypertension) is one of the most dangerous side effects of stress, as well as a huge risk factor for heart disease and stroke. However, it’s hard to be stressed when you’re laughing, so researchers have investigated whether laughter can bring blood pressure down. There are more than a few studies that show a reduction of blood pressure after laughter, such as a 2017 study in the Journal of Dental and Medical Research, where 40 patients undergoing hemodialysis listened to CDs of comic shows for 16 30-minute sessions over eight weeks, and saw a decrease in blood pressure.
After three months, the blood pressure readings significantly decreased overall by 5 mmHg among the laughers. People in the comparison group showed no change in blood pressure readings.


LAUGHTER CAN REDUCE ANXIETY AND OTHER NEGATIVE EMOTIONS.

A 1990 study in Psychological Reports looked at the effects of humorous laughter on threat-induced anxiety. Researchers led 53 college students to believe (falsely) that they were going to receive an electric shock after a waiting period.
Subjects in the experiment group listened to a humorous tape while waiting for their shock. The placebo group listened to a non-humorous tape, and the control group did not listen to any tape. The humour group reported that their anxiety decreased during the anticipatory period, and those with the highest self-reported level of sense of humour had the lowest reported anxiety.
Laughter therapy has also been shown to improve anxiety in patients with Parkinson’s disease, reduce anxiety and depression in nursing students, and improve optimism, self-esteem, and depression in menopausal women.
Laughter can act as positive coping mechanisms to help a person get through difficult times.

Day 11 off 100


LAUGHTER IS AN IMMUNE BOOSTER.


At the beginning of cold and flu season, it may be a good idea to practice some laughter therapy, as several studies have shown the immune boosting power of a chuckle. Watching a funny film or listening to a comedy podcast is great for the mind and body.


LAUGHTER MAY ACT AS A NATURAL ANTI-DEPRESSANT.


While nobody would recommend laughter in lieu of other treatment for depression, it has shown promise at lifting depressed moods. Patients in long-term care facilities often suffer from depression and poor sleep, so a 2017 study tested the effects of laughter therapy on 42 residents of two long-term care hospitals. The results were promising.
The laugher therapy, which the subjects undertook over eight sessions, for 40 minutes twice a week, included “singing funny songs, laughing for diversion, stretching, playing with hands and dance routines, laughing exercises, healthy clapping, and laughing aloud.”
The results showed reduced depression and general mood improvement as well as improved sleep in the experiment group compared to the control group.


YOU BREATHE BETTER AFTER LAUGHING.


It turns out that a good bout of deep belly laughter can lead to increased heart rate, respiratory rate, and oxygen consumption, which are similar to what happens during exercise. While a 2009 study in the International Journal of Humour Research found that these changes only last as long as the laughter itself, if you can laugh like that for 30 minutes to an hour, maybe you can skip the gym.

Took the Doctors advice.


LAUGHTER IS GOOD FOR YOUR CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.


Your lungs aren’t the only organ that benefits from a great guffaw. A 2009 study in Medical Hypotheses found powerful benefits to the heart and cardiovascular system.
Study participants watched either a comedy like Only Fools and Horses or the bleak opening sequence of Saving Private Ryan, which is known to increase mental stress. They used a technique called brachial artery reactivity testing (BART), a form of ultrasound that looks at the brachial artery. Participants who watched the stressful movie experienced a 35 percent reduction in flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD, or how blood vessels dilate and contract); sluggish FMD is a risk factor for atherosclerosis. Meanwhile, the group that watched the funny scene saw a 22 percent increase in FMD, comparable to exercise. In short, laughing helped their blood flow better.
The Heart Association recommends laughter for a healthy heart, adding that research has shown laughter promotes reduced artery inflammation and increased production of HDL, or “good” cholesterol.


LAUGHTER CALMS STRESS HORMONES.

Humour, and by extension, laughter, stimulates multiple physiological systems that decrease levels of stress hormones, such as cortisol and epinephrine, and increase the activation of the dopamine-dispensing reward system of the brain, according to researchers of a 2017 study in Advances in Physiology Education. A 2003 study in Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine found that viewing a funny film decreased a wide variety of stress hormones.

I had company during isolation.


SOCIAL LAUGHTER CAN RELIEVE PAIN.

Laughter might be as good as some analgesics for pain, something early physicians seemed to understand. In the 14th century, French surgeon Henri de Mondeville used humour to distract patients from the pain of surgery and to help them during recovery.
More modern research has found that participants who watched comedy videos needed less pain medication than those who watched control videos. In a 2011 study published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society, over the course of six experiments using extreme cold as a pain-tolerance measure, researchers found that social laughter—laughter done in groups in a social context—elevates pain thresholds. The authors suggest, “These results can best be explained by the action of endorphins released by laughter.”


LAUGHING BURNS CALORIES.


As if all of these benefits aren’t a good enough reason to giggle every day, a 2014 study in the International Journal of Obesity found that laughter can burn calories. Researchers broke a group of 45 participants into two groups, half of whom watched film clips intended to evoke laughter for approximately 10 minutes, and half who watched film clips unlikely to stimulate laughter. Both groups were attached to a “calorimeter” that measured energy expenditure and heart rate. They determined that those who laughed during their viewing burned up to 10 calories in 10 minutes, as compared to those who did not laugh and did not burn any calories.
So turns out not only was I making people smile I was helping in all sorts of ways.
I got such positive feedback from Facebook friends and followers that I made a book which is now available from Amazon in Paperback Kindle and direct from me as an Ebook. Come on, you knew there had to be a plug in their somewhere. PS. Half the profits (if there are any, Please buy my book 🙂 ) will go to an NHS charity.

100 Days in isolation. Available NOW!

Over 200 jokes and original pictures, to keep you smiling long after this virus has gone.

Keep smiling
Until next week. Take care and stay safe.

Jon X

Hypnotherapy in Suffolk, Essex and Cambridge. and online via Zoom

Jon Adkin Author of ‘Can I Change?’ Available from Amazon.

Find me on You TubeFacebook and Instagram.

Are you ready to leave lockdown?

Hi, Welcome to this weeks blog.

I opened my doors for one to one last week, working within the Government guidelines of social distancing. The response has been great, and I thank anyone who I have seen since I opened.

What I have noticed from the messages and the phone conversations that I’ve received this week is that there seems to be a whole new lot of problems that have arisen because of Covid-19. I think because of the lockdown new issues have raised their heads, some serious some not so serious. The not so serious were things like, My next door neighbours cat meows too loud, or I slept for 3 hours in the afternoon and I can’t get to sleep at night, and many more. What the lockdown has done is heightened senses. We have become more aware of things going on around us. We have also got out of routines, So taking a 3 hour sleep in the afternoon is of course going to disrupt your usual sleep pattern.

We are slowly coming out of lockdown, so perhaps next week you need to start getting back into a routine. You could start by getting out of your PJ’s or your trackies. Start dressing normally again.

Reintroduce your old routine 

If you’re preparing to start going back into the office or do the school run, it’s a good idea to start easing back into your old routine now. Set your alarm for the time you would normally get up and go to bed at the time you did pre-lockdown. 

If you have a household with children, that means getting the whole family back onto this timezone too. Go through the motions of your old routine too – get showered and dressed and do your hair as if you were going into the office. 

‘Also – ensure you create a sense of weekdays and weekends by focussing on chores and work during the week and relaxation time for weekends – just as you used to do. This all helps to create a sense of confidence that we are ready to readjust and resets our body clocks in preparation for the event.

Suggest a catch up on Zoom

Suggest a Zoom work catch-up 

One of the most common anxieties I hear from people in my practice, is the thought of going back to work and having face to face meetings or social interaction

To help reduce anxiety around this, reach out to work colleagues – FaceTime them – ahead of going back to work. This will significantly help to alleviate some of your fears as you reconnect with them and you’ll feel that much more confident about your long-awaited physical interaction with them. 

‘You could even suggest a Zoom call with a group of colleagues to create a sense of togetherness and establish your sense of community.

Re-introduce your work wardrobe 

The clothes we wear affect our mood, confidence, attitudes and even the way we behave and interact with people. So now – more than ever – think of this as your psychological armour for        re-entering the world. 

‘Many of us have been living in a uniform of comfy sweats and elasticated waist trousers for what feels like an eternity but it’s time to go through your wardrobe and create your capsule ‘back to the world’ key looks.  Even invest in a few new pieces if it helps you feel good. Not only will this mentally empower you, it removes a huge amount of pressure and stress when the day finally comes – it’s one less thing to think about. And simplicity is key in reducing anxiety.

Start cutting down now.

Reduce your screen time 

The trepidation and confusion caused by information overload is a huge contributor towards anxiety levels. As you prepare to go back into the outside world, take stock and account of the amount of screen time you spend browsing social media and news sites. 

Many of us have increased our intake of social media sites and that has caused a massive increase in anxiety rates. Children also need to be told not to spend so much time on You Tube and Tik Tok etc. If you start to reduce their viewing times now, it won’t come as so much of a shock when normality finally returns. Limit your own screen time to once or twice daily and be aware of the people or information sources that create a feeling of dread – avoid these. Especially on days when you’re feeling high levels of anxiety.

If you find zoom chats exhausting you’re not alone. Video calls can be harder to navigate in many ways than face to face interactions, because we are so focused on seeing our own face. 

‘It can also feel rather overwhelming when everyone is talking at the same time. Instead of solely relying on Zoom, get back into the habit of speaking to people you care about on the phone.’

Strike up a conversation with a stranger

Walk your dog or your child where you know you’ll find other people, such as in the park, whilst maintaining social distancing. Give yourself an exercise each day to strike up a conversation with someone you don’t know – even from a few metres away. 

‘Having been locked up at home for weeks, we are used to giving people a wide berth and it’s easy to feel a sense of fear and mistrust when we see someone new. Get back into the habit of smiling and making eye contact, rather than leaping into the nearest hedge when someone approaches.’

Another option is to set up a chair by your front door and talk to people as they pass. Setting up a chair at your front door with a cuppa or a glass of wine and chat to people walking past, can be very enjoyable, Connecting with people, from the safety of your garden or balcony, or even an open window is a good first step to re-socialising, plus you may even make friends new people in your neighbourhood. 

Although it may feel strange at first, don’t focus on your own feelings of awkwardness. Instead, focus on the fact that your friendliness could brighten up someone else’s day.

And finally for this week.

Equip yourself with a mask and podcast for the first commute 

‘It’s important to differentiate that, for most people, the fear of going outside of the house is not rooted in the action of going outside in itself – it’s the fear of becoming infected.

‘Naturally, the idea of boarding public transport or a cramped commuter train where we are not in control of social distancing nor has it been effectively enforced, is enough to send us over the edge and into panic attack territory. It’s so important to gear yourself up for this mentally if you have no choice but to use public transport. Beyond the basics of equipping yourself with a protective mask, gloves and hand sanitiser, download your favourite podcasts or playlist that helps to relax and transport you to a place of calm or take a book to read.

I wish you all a safe and health week. Until next time

Take care, Best wishes

Jon X

Hypnotherapy in Suffolk, Essex and Cambridge.

Jon Adkin Author of ‘Can I Change?’ Available from Amazon.

Find me on You TubeFacebook and Instagram.

What’s the new normal?

Hi Welcome to my weekly blog.

This week I re opened my doors for one to one clients. As lock down eases here in the UK we need to get back to normal, but what is normal? are we ready for the new normal? Along with many things at the moment I don’t think anyone knows what the new normal is going to be. However what if we could make our own new normal. There is no reason why we can’t do that.

Make two lists and compare.

Think of your life before lockdown. What would you change given the Chance? in fact let’s have some fun, get a pen and some paper put a line down the middle of the paper, and put two headings. One heading saying before lockdown, the other heading saying after lockdown.
Now make a list of things that you used to do before lockdown that you did every day , things like drive the kids to school, meet friends for coffee, go to the gym, make dinner in the evening, Watch TV, etc etc. So, you’re making a list of the things that you used to do. Now make a list of what you plan to do after lockdown. Perhaps walk the children to school, meet your friends in a park, plan a healthy meal, and prepare it with the children, go out for an evening walk, spend more time interacting with the family etc, etc.
Do you see a difference in your two lists? are there things that you are now doing that you would like to continue to do after lockdown? Are you enjoying spending more time playing with the children or talking to your partner? Have you started to enjoy walking again cause you got out to do your daily exercise? We can get a lot of positives out of this strange situation, and as individuals if we each bring out the good perhaps our new normal will be so much better.

Did you discover a new hobby?


If you’ve enjoyed playing with the children being creative, being silly, being parents. There is no reason why this must stop. Have the children enjoyed having their parents around more? Are they spending less time on the computer or their tablets or phones? They are all positives.
have you found a new hobby? perhaps you’ve been a bit more adventurous with your cooking, or found a new love for doing puzzles, or you have discovered reading again. again, all these are positives. Positives that you can continue well after lockdown is over.
Now once you’ve made those two lists, compare them and see what good things you can bring out of this lockdown with you. Yes, You may have to make adjustments in your lifestyle, once the children go back to school and you go back to work but changes can be made. Just because things get back to normal doesn’t mean they have to be the same as they always were.
Think of the money you will save by not meeting friends for coffee each day, but by making your own and going for a walk around the park chatting. Think how much fitter the children and you will be if you can walk to school (I know not always possible) and the added bonus of that is that you don’t feel the frustration and anxiety of driving on the school run, so your day starts so much better. How many of you drive to the gym (to get fit) whereas actually, you could have walked or jogged there? It is all the little changes that you can make that could make your new normal so much better for everyone.

It’s ok not to be ok.

Now on the flip side, there will be a lot of people that entered lockdown in a happy or happyish relationship, but because of the isolation, tension and frustration have built up and tempers have flared. If that is you Don’t panic. I want you to get a pen and paper and again put a line down the middle, but this time Your headings will be How it was. And How it is. And again make 2 lists. However, this time it will show you what you had, and it will be up to you to get it back.

If you were happy going into lockdown, then you can get that happiness back. Not everyone wants to be around their partner or their kids 24/7 Not everyone has the patience to keep the kids entertained, and that is ok. As long as all parties were happy and safe and well.
You must do what works for you. This lockdown has bought out the best and the worst in people. What all of us need to do now is say we survived that and look forward now and leave the worse parts behind. As I said in one of my Facebook posts, We may not all be in the same boat, but we are all in the same storm.

Until next week

Stay safe, Stay healthy and look after yourself.

Jon X

Hypnotherapy in Suffolk, Essex and Cambridge.

Jon Adkin Author of ‘Can I Change?’ Available from Amazon.

Find me on You TubeFacebook and Instagram.