Laughter really is the best medicine.

Hi, Welcome to this weeks blog.
I said a few weeks ago that I handled the current Covid-19 situation with humour. I knew a lot of people were worried and even scared, but I felt that the last thing they needed was for someone to keep reminding them that they were feeling anxious or stressed. I wanted to take their mind off of the situation so each day I posted an original funny picture or a corny gag to make people start their day with a smile. I didn’t take the decision lightly as I knew that people all around the world were suffering or sadly dying. However there was nothing that I could do to stop that, but I could make people smile and take their mind off of the situation, even if only for a short time. Turns out I was right. I continued to study the effects of laughter and I have compiled this list to show you just how much it helps.
They say that laughter is “the best medicine,” and as it turns out, there is some scientific truth to this assertion. Humour-associated laughter has numerous health benefits, so here are 10 reasons you should laugh it up.


LAUGHTER IS A SIGN OF GOODWILL TO ALL OTHERS.


Laughter may be unique to humans. Why do we do it? According to a 2010 study in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, laughter and smiling are generally intended as a message of good will. The authors extrapolate that there is a similar function in primates, who use facial expressions with bared teeth to suggest friendliness and sociability. They write, “Because some forms of smiling are voluntary and easily faked, laughter, which requires a more synergetic contraction of the wider musculature, is believed to have evolved in humans to express a secure, safe message to others.”

Day 5 I started going nuts.


LAUGHTER MAY REDUCE YOUR BLOOD PRESSURE.

High blood pressure (hypertension) is one of the most dangerous side effects of stress, as well as a huge risk factor for heart disease and stroke. However, it’s hard to be stressed when you’re laughing, so researchers have investigated whether laughter can bring blood pressure down. There are more than a few studies that show a reduction of blood pressure after laughter, such as a 2017 study in the Journal of Dental and Medical Research, where 40 patients undergoing hemodialysis listened to CDs of comic shows for 16 30-minute sessions over eight weeks, and saw a decrease in blood pressure.
After three months, the blood pressure readings significantly decreased overall by 5 mmHg among the laughers. People in the comparison group showed no change in blood pressure readings.


LAUGHTER CAN REDUCE ANXIETY AND OTHER NEGATIVE EMOTIONS.

A 1990 study in Psychological Reports looked at the effects of humorous laughter on threat-induced anxiety. Researchers led 53 college students to believe (falsely) that they were going to receive an electric shock after a waiting period.
Subjects in the experiment group listened to a humorous tape while waiting for their shock. The placebo group listened to a non-humorous tape, and the control group did not listen to any tape. The humour group reported that their anxiety decreased during the anticipatory period, and those with the highest self-reported level of sense of humour had the lowest reported anxiety.
Laughter therapy has also been shown to improve anxiety in patients with Parkinson’s disease, reduce anxiety and depression in nursing students, and improve optimism, self-esteem, and depression in menopausal women.
Laughter can act as positive coping mechanisms to help a person get through difficult times.

Day 11 off 100


LAUGHTER IS AN IMMUNE BOOSTER.


At the beginning of cold and flu season, it may be a good idea to practice some laughter therapy, as several studies have shown the immune boosting power of a chuckle. Watching a funny film or listening to a comedy podcast is great for the mind and body.


LAUGHTER MAY ACT AS A NATURAL ANTI-DEPRESSANT.


While nobody would recommend laughter in lieu of other treatment for depression, it has shown promise at lifting depressed moods. Patients in long-term care facilities often suffer from depression and poor sleep, so a 2017 study tested the effects of laughter therapy on 42 residents of two long-term care hospitals. The results were promising.
The laugher therapy, which the subjects undertook over eight sessions, for 40 minutes twice a week, included “singing funny songs, laughing for diversion, stretching, playing with hands and dance routines, laughing exercises, healthy clapping, and laughing aloud.”
The results showed reduced depression and general mood improvement as well as improved sleep in the experiment group compared to the control group.


YOU BREATHE BETTER AFTER LAUGHING.


It turns out that a good bout of deep belly laughter can lead to increased heart rate, respiratory rate, and oxygen consumption, which are similar to what happens during exercise. While a 2009 study in the International Journal of Humour Research found that these changes only last as long as the laughter itself, if you can laugh like that for 30 minutes to an hour, maybe you can skip the gym.

Took the Doctors advice.


LAUGHTER IS GOOD FOR YOUR CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.


Your lungs aren’t the only organ that benefits from a great guffaw. A 2009 study in Medical Hypotheses found powerful benefits to the heart and cardiovascular system.
Study participants watched either a comedy like Only Fools and Horses or the bleak opening sequence of Saving Private Ryan, which is known to increase mental stress. They used a technique called brachial artery reactivity testing (BART), a form of ultrasound that looks at the brachial artery. Participants who watched the stressful movie experienced a 35 percent reduction in flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD, or how blood vessels dilate and contract); sluggish FMD is a risk factor for atherosclerosis. Meanwhile, the group that watched the funny scene saw a 22 percent increase in FMD, comparable to exercise. In short, laughing helped their blood flow better.
The Heart Association recommends laughter for a healthy heart, adding that research has shown laughter promotes reduced artery inflammation and increased production of HDL, or “good” cholesterol.


LAUGHTER CALMS STRESS HORMONES.

Humour, and by extension, laughter, stimulates multiple physiological systems that decrease levels of stress hormones, such as cortisol and epinephrine, and increase the activation of the dopamine-dispensing reward system of the brain, according to researchers of a 2017 study in Advances in Physiology Education. A 2003 study in Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine found that viewing a funny film decreased a wide variety of stress hormones.

I had company during isolation.


SOCIAL LAUGHTER CAN RELIEVE PAIN.

Laughter might be as good as some analgesics for pain, something early physicians seemed to understand. In the 14th century, French surgeon Henri de Mondeville used humour to distract patients from the pain of surgery and to help them during recovery.
More modern research has found that participants who watched comedy videos needed less pain medication than those who watched control videos. In a 2011 study published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society, over the course of six experiments using extreme cold as a pain-tolerance measure, researchers found that social laughter—laughter done in groups in a social context—elevates pain thresholds. The authors suggest, “These results can best be explained by the action of endorphins released by laughter.”


LAUGHING BURNS CALORIES.


As if all of these benefits aren’t a good enough reason to giggle every day, a 2014 study in the International Journal of Obesity found that laughter can burn calories. Researchers broke a group of 45 participants into two groups, half of whom watched film clips intended to evoke laughter for approximately 10 minutes, and half who watched film clips unlikely to stimulate laughter. Both groups were attached to a “calorimeter” that measured energy expenditure and heart rate. They determined that those who laughed during their viewing burned up to 10 calories in 10 minutes, as compared to those who did not laugh and did not burn any calories.
So turns out not only was I making people smile I was helping in all sorts of ways.
I got such positive feedback from Facebook friends and followers that I made a book which is now available from Amazon in Paperback Kindle and direct from me as an Ebook. Come on, you knew there had to be a plug in their somewhere. PS. Half the profits (if there are any, Please buy my book 🙂 ) will go to an NHS charity.

100 Days in isolation. Available NOW!

Over 200 jokes and original pictures, to keep you smiling long after this virus has gone.

Keep smiling
Until next week. Take care and stay safe.

Jon X

Hypnotherapy in Suffolk, Essex and Cambridge. and online via Zoom

Jon Adkin Author of ‘Can I Change?’ Available from Amazon.

Find me on You TubeFacebook and Instagram.

What’s the new normal?

Hi Welcome to my weekly blog.

This week I re opened my doors for one to one clients. As lock down eases here in the UK we need to get back to normal, but what is normal? are we ready for the new normal? Along with many things at the moment I don’t think anyone knows what the new normal is going to be. However what if we could make our own new normal. There is no reason why we can’t do that.

Make two lists and compare.

Think of your life before lockdown. What would you change given the Chance? in fact let’s have some fun, get a pen and some paper put a line down the middle of the paper, and put two headings. One heading saying before lockdown, the other heading saying after lockdown.
Now make a list of things that you used to do before lockdown that you did every day , things like drive the kids to school, meet friends for coffee, go to the gym, make dinner in the evening, Watch TV, etc etc. So, you’re making a list of the things that you used to do. Now make a list of what you plan to do after lockdown. Perhaps walk the children to school, meet your friends in a park, plan a healthy meal, and prepare it with the children, go out for an evening walk, spend more time interacting with the family etc, etc.
Do you see a difference in your two lists? are there things that you are now doing that you would like to continue to do after lockdown? Are you enjoying spending more time playing with the children or talking to your partner? Have you started to enjoy walking again cause you got out to do your daily exercise? We can get a lot of positives out of this strange situation, and as individuals if we each bring out the good perhaps our new normal will be so much better.

Did you discover a new hobby?


If you’ve enjoyed playing with the children being creative, being silly, being parents. There is no reason why this must stop. Have the children enjoyed having their parents around more? Are they spending less time on the computer or their tablets or phones? They are all positives.
have you found a new hobby? perhaps you’ve been a bit more adventurous with your cooking, or found a new love for doing puzzles, or you have discovered reading again. again, all these are positives. Positives that you can continue well after lockdown is over.
Now once you’ve made those two lists, compare them and see what good things you can bring out of this lockdown with you. Yes, You may have to make adjustments in your lifestyle, once the children go back to school and you go back to work but changes can be made. Just because things get back to normal doesn’t mean they have to be the same as they always were.
Think of the money you will save by not meeting friends for coffee each day, but by making your own and going for a walk around the park chatting. Think how much fitter the children and you will be if you can walk to school (I know not always possible) and the added bonus of that is that you don’t feel the frustration and anxiety of driving on the school run, so your day starts so much better. How many of you drive to the gym (to get fit) whereas actually, you could have walked or jogged there? It is all the little changes that you can make that could make your new normal so much better for everyone.

It’s ok not to be ok.

Now on the flip side, there will be a lot of people that entered lockdown in a happy or happyish relationship, but because of the isolation, tension and frustration have built up and tempers have flared. If that is you Don’t panic. I want you to get a pen and paper and again put a line down the middle, but this time Your headings will be How it was. And How it is. And again make 2 lists. However, this time it will show you what you had, and it will be up to you to get it back.

If you were happy going into lockdown, then you can get that happiness back. Not everyone wants to be around their partner or their kids 24/7 Not everyone has the patience to keep the kids entertained, and that is ok. As long as all parties were happy and safe and well.
You must do what works for you. This lockdown has bought out the best and the worst in people. What all of us need to do now is say we survived that and look forward now and leave the worse parts behind. As I said in one of my Facebook posts, We may not all be in the same boat, but we are all in the same storm.

Until next week

Stay safe, Stay healthy and look after yourself.

Jon X

Hypnotherapy in Suffolk, Essex and Cambridge.

Jon Adkin Author of ‘Can I Change?’ Available from Amazon.

Find me on You TubeFacebook and Instagram.

So long May, Hello June

Hi.

Welcome to my weekly blog, and yes I’ve been good recently and been doing a weekly blog. So if you haven’y been keeping up, you have some catching up to do.

This week I want to talk about coming out of lockdown. What will it mean for you? I’m opening my hypnotherapy practice from Monday with new guidelines in place for the safety of my clients. I felt the time was right to open, because as we ease out of lockdown, there are a lot of people that are scared I want to help those people.

Have you learnt anything about yourself during this lockdown? I know I have. Is there anything that you are going to bring out of it that you like? Or are there somethings that you didn’t like that you want to leave behind?

Isolation has definitely put a strain on relationships, but that can be repaired before the damage is done. Perhaps you have been drinking or eating too much. Once again those patterns of behaviour can be stopped, before they become a habit.

I want to share with you some things not to do as lockdown is eased. As I am opening on Monday I have been doing a lot of research regarding do’s and don’ts for the safety of my clients. A lot of this is common sense but as we have all seen sometimes that doesn’t apply.

Don’t worry, just take care.

What NOT to do as lockdown restrictions are lifted.

A phased approach to lifting lockdown restrictions has already begun here in the UK and around the world, but that doesn’t mean the deadly coronavirus has gone away. In the UK, over 38,000 people have already died from the COVID-19 disease, and the numbers are growing. We know that life will look different when cities reopen as politicians attempt to restart the economy while trying to keep a second wave of coronavirus infections at bay.

As we count down the days until you can hug your friends, throw a party, file into a football stadium and board an airplane, just remember that even as some restrictions loosen, that there’s still much we don’t know about the long-term behavior of this particular coronavirus strain.

Don’t toss out those face masks

As shopping centres and nonessential businesses begin to open, look for more coronavirus-slowing policies to go into effect, not fewer. That means social distancing, and both employees and customers wearing face masks or other face coverings. There may be a lot of other rules, too, depending on where you live and what you’re doing.

Expect more sanitation stations with hand sanitizer and gloves, and a less personal experience wherever you go, like being entry if your temperature is too high or ordering at counters with plexiglass dividers between. Expect that some shopping and socialising experiences won’t go back to normal for some time.

Don’t go to the gym without a plan

Gyms and fitness centers are part of early phase reopening in some spots, but think before you grab your water bottle and lace up your shoes. You’ll have to decide if you think it’s safe to return so soon. Enclosed areas where people breathe the same recirculated air for long periods of time are especially high risk, and that’s what gyms are.

Even if you sanitize the same common equipment between use, gyms are ripe for exchanging germs. Severely limiting the number of people in the gym at a time — and how long they can work out — is one approach. Requiring gym-goers to exercise with a face mask or face covering of some sort is another, which could make breathing more difficult during intense workouts. It’ll be important to assess your personal risk, and risk to others.

Don’t throw a party or hit the bars (When they open)

Social distancing measures exist for a reason, and that’s to slow the spread of viral transmission from people who come into close contact. Hosting a party at home or crowding into a bar when they reopen will jam people together in a room, giving any lingering coronavirus on an asymptomatic host the prime opportunity to infect others, who then could pass it along.

Even if bars reopen in your area, as they are doing in some places around the world, they’ll likely do so with limited hours (e.g. closing at 11 p.m.), social distancing and limited capacity. It’s up to you to be judicious about protecting your health.

Don’t stop washing your hands

Of course you’ll continue to practice common hygiene, but remember that relaxed restrictions won’t necessarily mean that the coronavirus outbreak is over, even after a vaccine eventually arrives. There may be economic reasons for schools and businesses to reopen, while the virus continues to spread, albeit at slower rates than today.

Remember that the goal of stay at home orders and thorough handwashing is to keep hospitals from being overwhelmed with patients in critical condition and minimize your risk for acquiring life-threatening symptoms.

Hopefully, the good hand-washing habits you’ve acquired during this time will stick around, including longer, more thorough washing with hand soap, and more frequently after coming into contact with people and common surfaces.

Don’t immediately visit high-risk people

There’s nothing I’d rather do when quarantine ends than rush out and give the senior citizens and immunocompromised friends in my life a big, warm hug. But that might not be the best move for them. Quarantine measures are likely to loosen before the vaccine arrives that will help protect people most at risk if they do acquire COVID-19.

Though early vaccine testing is underway, an approved vaccine is still thought to be a year out, at the very least. That doesn’t necessarily mean you won’t see your loved ones for a full year.

Antibody testing is a promising method in development right now that could be able to tell you if you’ve already been exposed to the coronavirus. Unfortunately, we’re not at the stage where this test — which isn’t yet available — can confirm immunity.

For people who are in high-risk groups, keeping a healthy distance may still be the best way to keep them safe. That’s something you and your family will need to carefully evaluate.

There will plenty of time for holidays in the future.

Don’t plan a big international holiday

I’ve already started a mental list of every place in the world I want to visit once restrictions lift. However Like me, you’ll have to have a little patience.

While I expect that hotel and airfare prices will be enticingly cheap when nonessential travel is first deemed acceptable again, flying on a plane it isn’t likely to be a fun experience in many ways. Think: wearing masks the duration of the flight, very limited food and beverage service on long hauls and plenty of closed businesses at the airport terminals themselves. On the plus side, you’ll likely have more leg room (Not that I need it).

Intermingling is nearly impossible to avoid in airports and airplanes (though not because of the ventilation system, according to the WHO), which is one major reason flights have been canceled and international travel effectively banned in many countries.

The international movement of people contributed to the coronavirus reaching pandemic proportions so quickly, through person-to-person transmission like coughing and sneezing. If a recurrence were to happen, the last thing you want is the stress of finding yourself quarantined in an unfamiliar country, without a clear or quick way home.

Don’t get too comfortable


Not to be the bearer of bad news, but as a global society, we can’t say for certain what will happen next — if a sudden surge in new coronavirus cases will make it necessary to reinstitute quarantine measures, as has happened in Singapore and Hong Kong, or, worse, fears of a more contagious strain come to be.

The smart thing to do is remain cautiously optimistic about regaining your freedom to move, but remain realistic that we don’t know what the future holds.

Don’t let this control you. Take precautions of course but don’t overthink or worry unnecessarily.

Until next week.

Stay safe, stay healthy

Jon X

Hypnotherapy in Suffolk, Essex and Cambridge.

Jon Adkin Author of ‘Can I Change?’ Available from Amazon.

Find me on You TubeFacebook and Instagram.

Is online therapy just as good?

Hi

welcome to this weeks blog, I was hoping to open my doors for one to one sessions this week but after the prime ministers announcement I found that sadly it still wasn’t safe to do one to one with my clients.

So the question is, are online sessions as good as one to one sessions? The answer to that is yes if you want them to be. Hypnotherapy can be a very powerful and helpful way to make you feel and think differently. However hypnotherapy will only work, if you want it to work. So really where you have it done or how you have it done doesn’t matter, as long as you are prepared to relax and follow instruction then online will work for you. It all starts with a call.

It could be the best call you ever make.

There can be some advantages to having a session online. Firstly some people feel more comfortable in their own home. They can choose perhaps their favourite chair or even their own bed to relax on. No travelling is involved, and at the moment I’m working up till 11:30 PM so that you can have your session once the children are in bed and you can relax more fully.

There are somethings that we have to take into account, firstly a reliable Internet connection, Secondly a quiet place, somewhere you can go for about an hour that you won’t be disturbed. Throughout the session I will need to see your face show the laptop or tablet needs to be positioned in a place that it won’t fall down or be knocked over at anytime during the session. For my sessions I have found a piece of software called zoom to be the most reliable, it’s a free piece of software and is easily downloaded. 

Zoom is a free download available here.

So what happens at a session?

As always we start with a pre talk, I explain what I will do, and how I would do it, and you can tell me anything that you think I might need to know regarding the issue that you’ve come to me for. However, as I have found out many times the issue isn’t always the issue. What do I mean by that, I mean, that if you came to me say with a weight problem, there may be an underlying problem as to why you gained the weight. Perhaps, you had a bad experience with a former partner and you ate to make yourself unattractive so that you wouldn’t get hurt again. Or perhaps you have no confidence or self esteem, but why, was you put down perhaps by an adult a sibling even a teacher, And their words stuck in your mind and over the years those words have dictated how you lived your life.

You may not even know why you feel the way you do, but your subconscious mind will know exactly why, And it’s those thoughts that I help you change.

One question people ask me before I do an online session is what happens if we do lose connection for whatever reason, will they stay in trance? And the answer to that is NO!. I put in a suggestion very early to say that if my voice isn’t heard for any length of time then my clients will just wake up naturally, feeling good.

Just before a zoom session.

HOW IT WORKS:

1. To arrange an online zoom session, please email me at jadkin.bahyp@gmail.com or book online at jadkinbahyp.youcanbook.me and include a contact number – I will then call you to arrange an online appointment at a time that suits you, between 9.00AM and 11.00PM

2. We will have a brief chat on the phone so I have a full understanding of your needs – this is free of charge. We will then arrange a time for your session; Payment is made by BACs transfer before the session.

3. During the session, we will be able to see each other – you can use a desktop, laptop, tablet, or even a mobile phone; Ideally if you have a set of headphones, that would be great as they help to block out any unwanted background noises.

4. You will need to sit in a comfortable chair and have a pillow or cushion handy to support your head;

5. Each session is tailored to your own specific needs.

I have been using online hypnotherapy since I went full time, mainly for clients who cannot make it to my practise room on a particular day for some reason, and I have found it to be very effective. I use either Zoom, WhatsApp or Skype, but we can discuss this during your free phone consultation.

During the current coronavirus outbreak it is invaluable to allow you to access treatment whilst maintaining social distancing or self-isolation. Giving you complete peace of mind.

I have a page on my website dedicated to online sessions.

So just to clarify the Benefits of Online Hypnotherapy

Online hypnotherapy also brings some bonus benefits in its own right.

Accessible

Provided a person can make the time difference work, anyone, anywhere in the world can now access hypnotherapy with me. All they need is a device that can run Zoom and some headphones if preferred to listen to my voice.

It has also opened my services up to clients with disabilities who cannot travel to a physical clinical location easily or indeed at all.

Comfortable & Relaxing

One paradoxical problem of in-person hypnotherapy is that, especially for people new to hypnosis, the process of attending is not necessarily a relaxing experience. Myths and misconceptions about hypnosis (and hypnotists!) can make the whole experience seem quite daunting and a bit scary.

Plus, the more professional and ‘clinical’ a practice becomes, the more likely it is to set off a bit of ‘white coat anxiety’ in even the calmest person.

By being able to engage in online hypnosis via 1-2-1 sessions from the comfort of your own home, the above is massively reduced if not eliminated completely.

There will always be new ways to evolve both the art and science of changing minds, but right now online hypnotherapy is one of the most exciting areas to be working in.

And as a special promotion during this lock-down period I am offering my Online sessions for just £65. A 20% saving off my normal price.

Hope to see you online soon.

So there you are. I hope that helps if you are thinking of asking for help but wanted more information. If I haven’t answered your specific question please message me or Contact me and I will be happy to answer.

Until next week, stay safe, stay healthy

Best wishes

Jon X

Hypnotherapy in Suffolk, Essex and Cambridge.

Jon Adkin Author of ‘Can I Change?’ Available from Amazon.

Find me on You TubeFacebook and Instagram.

Plan for the future

As much as it may feel like it, this will not last forever. So, what better way to feel less alone then to plan what you will do when isolation is finally over!  

Make a future fun list with all the places you would like to go when lockdown is lifted. Plan a trip for you and your family or friends, or make a bucket list of places that you would you like to go in your lifetime, it might seem silly it will help you focus on a time that is a little more enjoyable.

Connect with others

perhaps, the most important way to combat loneliness in self isolation he’s connecting with other people. However, instead of sending a text or jumping on Facebook why not send a postcard or a letter? Hello

you will have fun writing it, and you will brighten up someone’s day.

Do something meaningful

losing your sense of purpose can be a huge factor in feeling lonely. All of us wants to feel like we are doing something meaningful and that can be difficult whilst your having to stay at home.

only you know what will give you meaning, but if you are struggling for ideas why not volunteer through a local charity or group or perhaps start an online course.  

Get online

The Internet, when used correctly, to make you feel less lonely. There are so many amazing apps and communities available to help combat loneliness. Here are some suggestions.

Zoom or FaceTime friends and family, you could have a quiz night or dinner date. The possibilities are endless. Join a forum or Facebook group of a hobby that you love, Or join quarantine chat, a service specifically set up to help people connect doing lockdown.

I Got online and offer online sessions

Want some more ideas, how to pass the time in lockdown? How about some of these.

Tour ancient Rome

You may feel cut off from the rest of the world, but you can time travel. 

Current technology means that you can explore other cities and even other times online, such as this virtual tour of ancient Rome which takes you through the forum, capitoline hill, and famous monuments.

Enjoy the Musée d’Orsay

Experiencing these venues from your home does mean that you can visit multiple galleries from different countries or even different continents in the same afternoon. 

Paris’ Musée d’Orsay is home to an incredible collection of Van Gogh and Cezanne’s artistic masterpieces. Take a look around online. 

 Pop into the Tate

Perhaps once you’ve enjoyed Florence, New York, and Paris, you can come to London to see the Tate Britain for free. 

Although you’ll miss out on the lovely river walk to the gallery, you can drop in at any time and see your favourite pieces from the comfort of your own home.  

Experience the British Museum

The British Museum is home to incredible artefacts from around the world and is still open to virtual visitors. 

Exhibits that are usually packed are free to roam around at any time, so you can brush up on your Egyptian knowledge, see the controversial Parthenon Marbles, or just wile away a few hours. 

Go to 500 other museums or galleries 

If you’re still looking for more galleries or museums to visit, Google’s arts and culture collection has virtual tours of 500 top attractions around the world, including national galleries from around the world, individual artist museums, and even the Eiffel Tower.

Throwback.

Have a karaoke night 

Missing karaoke night with your friends? You can still do it from home. 

Apps like AirConsole let you turn your smartphone into a mic, and sing your favourite hits with the usual gang and practice new songs to sing at the bar once lockdown is lifted. 

Try a fitness challenge

Missing the gym? There are plenty of fitness challenges you can try out from home, so you can emerge from lockdown fitter, leaner, or stronger. 

You could try the 100 pushup challengesquat challenge, or just doing a 30-day bodyweight workout challenge to stay healthy at home for free. 

Just make sure that you don’t push too hard early on, and warm up thoroughly before you do any exercise. 

Arrange a Houseparty 

If you still want to meet with your friends – do it at a virtual Houseparty

The app allows for large group video chats so you can get together for a drink, a chat, or just to see some friendly faces for a couple of hours. 

Play a board game

Board game lovers will be pleased to know that there are ways to play your favourite games online, so you don’t have to wait for the lockdown to end to try out your new Scythe strategy or to finally play Terraforming Mars with a friend. 

Websites like Tabletopia have free accounts for players, but you may need to pay to play some of the more popular or newer games. 

Learn a language

Always wanted to speak Italian? Intrigued by Norwegian? Think that Mandarin will be useful for work, or perhaps German

Lockdown gives you plenty of time to dedicate to learning a new language, brushing up on vocabulary, and testing out pronunciation.

Go to the aquarium

It’s almost impossible to recreate the strange grace and tranquility of aquariums but not entirely.

Although they’re closed to the public, Monterey Bay Aquarium have added a number of live cams to let you keep an eye on the jellyfish, kelp forest, coral reef, and even the penguins, completely free. 

Deep clean your house

Between dusty skirting boards, dirty tiling, and stained carpets, your home can offer days of distraction if you feel like doing that deep clean you’ve been putting off. 

There are plenty of online cleaning guides if the task looks too big, and focusing on one room at a time will help you divide up the work. 

Declutter your home

Being stuck at home can make you rethink how much of your stuff you really need. 

Do you really wear all the clothes spilling out of your wardrobe? And do you think you’ll really re-read those GCSE essays sitting in a box upstairs? You can decide what to donate and what to throw out, ready for a full clear out when the lockdown is lifted. 

Volunteer 

Sometimes the best way to get out of your head is to help other people. You may have some local groups that are focused on helping the vulnerable or isolated during lockdown. 

Learn first aid

It’s good to be prepared for an emergency, especially when urgent care centres are overwhelmed or you may not want to leave self-isolation for a relatively minor injury. 

You can learn basic first aid online, for free with FutureLearn. 

Another throw Back

Discover your roots

Wonder where your family was in the flu pandemic of 1918? 

Tracing your family tree can unearth lost memories or even distant relatives. Start by learning about genealogy and you can discover more about yourself and your background. 

Have a kitchen dance party

You can definitely have too much screen time. If workouts aren’t your thing or you just miss a good dance, put together a list of your favourite songs and dance around your kitchen. 

Don’t worry, nobody’s watching! 

I hope that has given you some ideas. We maybe on the home stretch now but even after lockdown is lifted, there is no reason why you can’t carry on any of these activities that you have enjoyed.

Until next week.

Stay safe, stay healthy.

Jon X

Hypnotherapy in Suffolk, Essex and Cambridge.

Jon Adkin Author of ‘Can I Change?’ Available from Amazon.

Find me on You TubeFacebook and Instagram.