Laughter really is the best medicine.

Hi, Welcome to this weeks blog.
I said a few weeks ago that I handled the current Covid-19 situation with humour. I knew a lot of people were worried and even scared, but I felt that the last thing they needed was for someone to keep reminding them that they were feeling anxious or stressed. I wanted to take their mind off of the situation so each day I posted an original funny picture or a corny gag to make people start their day with a smile. I didn’t take the decision lightly as I knew that people all around the world were suffering or sadly dying. However there was nothing that I could do to stop that, but I could make people smile and take their mind off of the situation, even if only for a short time. Turns out I was right. I continued to study the effects of laughter and I have compiled this list to show you just how much it helps.
They say that laughter is “the best medicine,” and as it turns out, there is some scientific truth to this assertion. Humour-associated laughter has numerous health benefits, so here are 10 reasons you should laugh it up.


LAUGHTER IS A SIGN OF GOODWILL TO ALL OTHERS.


Laughter may be unique to humans. Why do we do it? According to a 2010 study in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, laughter and smiling are generally intended as a message of good will. The authors extrapolate that there is a similar function in primates, who use facial expressions with bared teeth to suggest friendliness and sociability. They write, “Because some forms of smiling are voluntary and easily faked, laughter, which requires a more synergetic contraction of the wider musculature, is believed to have evolved in humans to express a secure, safe message to others.”

Day 5 I started going nuts.


LAUGHTER MAY REDUCE YOUR BLOOD PRESSURE.

High blood pressure (hypertension) is one of the most dangerous side effects of stress, as well as a huge risk factor for heart disease and stroke. However, it’s hard to be stressed when you’re laughing, so researchers have investigated whether laughter can bring blood pressure down. There are more than a few studies that show a reduction of blood pressure after laughter, such as a 2017 study in the Journal of Dental and Medical Research, where 40 patients undergoing hemodialysis listened to CDs of comic shows for 16 30-minute sessions over eight weeks, and saw a decrease in blood pressure.
After three months, the blood pressure readings significantly decreased overall by 5 mmHg among the laughers. People in the comparison group showed no change in blood pressure readings.


LAUGHTER CAN REDUCE ANXIETY AND OTHER NEGATIVE EMOTIONS.

A 1990 study in Psychological Reports looked at the effects of humorous laughter on threat-induced anxiety. Researchers led 53 college students to believe (falsely) that they were going to receive an electric shock after a waiting period.
Subjects in the experiment group listened to a humorous tape while waiting for their shock. The placebo group listened to a non-humorous tape, and the control group did not listen to any tape. The humour group reported that their anxiety decreased during the anticipatory period, and those with the highest self-reported level of sense of humour had the lowest reported anxiety.
Laughter therapy has also been shown to improve anxiety in patients with Parkinson’s disease, reduce anxiety and depression in nursing students, and improve optimism, self-esteem, and depression in menopausal women.
Laughter can act as positive coping mechanisms to help a person get through difficult times.

Day 11 off 100


LAUGHTER IS AN IMMUNE BOOSTER.


At the beginning of cold and flu season, it may be a good idea to practice some laughter therapy, as several studies have shown the immune boosting power of a chuckle. Watching a funny film or listening to a comedy podcast is great for the mind and body.


LAUGHTER MAY ACT AS A NATURAL ANTI-DEPRESSANT.


While nobody would recommend laughter in lieu of other treatment for depression, it has shown promise at lifting depressed moods. Patients in long-term care facilities often suffer from depression and poor sleep, so a 2017 study tested the effects of laughter therapy on 42 residents of two long-term care hospitals. The results were promising.
The laugher therapy, which the subjects undertook over eight sessions, for 40 minutes twice a week, included “singing funny songs, laughing for diversion, stretching, playing with hands and dance routines, laughing exercises, healthy clapping, and laughing aloud.”
The results showed reduced depression and general mood improvement as well as improved sleep in the experiment group compared to the control group.


YOU BREATHE BETTER AFTER LAUGHING.


It turns out that a good bout of deep belly laughter can lead to increased heart rate, respiratory rate, and oxygen consumption, which are similar to what happens during exercise. While a 2009 study in the International Journal of Humour Research found that these changes only last as long as the laughter itself, if you can laugh like that for 30 minutes to an hour, maybe you can skip the gym.

Took the Doctors advice.


LAUGHTER IS GOOD FOR YOUR CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.


Your lungs aren’t the only organ that benefits from a great guffaw. A 2009 study in Medical Hypotheses found powerful benefits to the heart and cardiovascular system.
Study participants watched either a comedy like Only Fools and Horses or the bleak opening sequence of Saving Private Ryan, which is known to increase mental stress. They used a technique called brachial artery reactivity testing (BART), a form of ultrasound that looks at the brachial artery. Participants who watched the stressful movie experienced a 35 percent reduction in flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD, or how blood vessels dilate and contract); sluggish FMD is a risk factor for atherosclerosis. Meanwhile, the group that watched the funny scene saw a 22 percent increase in FMD, comparable to exercise. In short, laughing helped their blood flow better.
The Heart Association recommends laughter for a healthy heart, adding that research has shown laughter promotes reduced artery inflammation and increased production of HDL, or “good” cholesterol.


LAUGHTER CALMS STRESS HORMONES.

Humour, and by extension, laughter, stimulates multiple physiological systems that decrease levels of stress hormones, such as cortisol and epinephrine, and increase the activation of the dopamine-dispensing reward system of the brain, according to researchers of a 2017 study in Advances in Physiology Education. A 2003 study in Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine found that viewing a funny film decreased a wide variety of stress hormones.

I had company during isolation.


SOCIAL LAUGHTER CAN RELIEVE PAIN.

Laughter might be as good as some analgesics for pain, something early physicians seemed to understand. In the 14th century, French surgeon Henri de Mondeville used humour to distract patients from the pain of surgery and to help them during recovery.
More modern research has found that participants who watched comedy videos needed less pain medication than those who watched control videos. In a 2011 study published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society, over the course of six experiments using extreme cold as a pain-tolerance measure, researchers found that social laughter—laughter done in groups in a social context—elevates pain thresholds. The authors suggest, “These results can best be explained by the action of endorphins released by laughter.”


LAUGHING BURNS CALORIES.


As if all of these benefits aren’t a good enough reason to giggle every day, a 2014 study in the International Journal of Obesity found that laughter can burn calories. Researchers broke a group of 45 participants into two groups, half of whom watched film clips intended to evoke laughter for approximately 10 minutes, and half who watched film clips unlikely to stimulate laughter. Both groups were attached to a “calorimeter” that measured energy expenditure and heart rate. They determined that those who laughed during their viewing burned up to 10 calories in 10 minutes, as compared to those who did not laugh and did not burn any calories.
So turns out not only was I making people smile I was helping in all sorts of ways.
I got such positive feedback from Facebook friends and followers that I made a book which is now available from Amazon in Paperback Kindle and direct from me as an Ebook. Come on, you knew there had to be a plug in their somewhere. PS. Half the profits (if there are any, Please buy my book 🙂 ) will go to an NHS charity.

100 Days in isolation. Available NOW!

Over 200 jokes and original pictures, to keep you smiling long after this virus has gone.

Keep smiling
Until next week. Take care and stay safe.

Jon X

Hypnotherapy in Suffolk, Essex and Cambridge. and online via Zoom

Jon Adkin Author of ‘Can I Change?’ Available from Amazon.

Find me on You TubeFacebook and Instagram.

Have a good night.

Hi This week my blog is looking at night time Anxiety. I hope that you have found some of the tips that I offered helpful over the last few weeks. Anxiety can affect us in so many different ways and sometimes you don’t even realise that it is anxiety that you are suffering from.

Anxiety at Night.

Night time is often considered to be a time of relaxation, where we mentally unwind and prepare ourselves for sleep. However, it is still quite common to experience an anxiety attack at night.
Anxiety attacks are frightening at the best of times, but when they occur unexpectedly in the silence and darkness of night time, they can be particularly hard to endure. In theory, we are at our most relaxed when we are asleep, so it seems an unlikely time for anxiety to flare up. However, this is a common problem.

What causes anxiety attacks at night?

Night time anxiety or panic attacks, like their day time cohorts, result from the ‘fight or flight’ instinct being triggered by a perceived aggressor. In this case, the aggressor is likely to be mental angst resulting from pent up worries.
In the business of daily life they recede into the background only to rear their monstrous heads when all distractions disappear. In the stillness of the night there is no running away, and if we allow the worry monster to keep up its aggression, an anxiety attack may well ensue.
We also know that the brain does not fully switch off when we are asleep. How often does an event that occurred during the day lead to an odd dream during the night? Our brain naturally tries to process and sort out the day’s events and if these have been stressful then our dreams may well provoke anxiety too.

What can I do to stop anxiety attacks at night?

Trying to fight a night time panic attack will only make it worse. Combat this as you would an anxiety attack during the day; try to slow down, breathe deeply, relax your muscles and calm your mind with whatever thoughts or images help to make you feel safe.
The adrenaline may continue to course through your body, so it is unlikely that you will be able to just to drop off back to sleep. You may even just begin worrying about not sleeping so it can help to get up and do something else to shift your focus. Ideally, simple activities like the ironing, listening to a calming meditation, reading an inspirational or gentle book etc. or even practising yoga poses for sleep may help.
Avoid any over stimulating activity. Only once you are feel ready for sleep should you go back to bed. When you lie down, remain calm by breathing deeply in through your nose and out through your mouth; if you are breathing correctly, your abdomen (not just your chest) will be rising on an in breath and falling on an out breath.
It is possible to learn how to rationally identify and accept the anxiety attack, and allow the fear to pass. With practise of sensible tools and techniques, anxiety attacks will diminish in severity and frequency.

More Night time Tips

clock-hours-minutes-9352

Sleep by the clock

When it comes to sleep, timing is everything, as Dr Michael Breus reveals in a new ground-breaking book. Our circadian rhythm – also known as the biological clock – affects every aspect of our life, including our ability to sleep well. Going to bed at the correct bio time means you won’t lie awake feeling wired.
Wind down, not up
Sleep is a natural physiological process – but you can help it along and avoid additional anxiety by having a set wind-down routine. The goal of this is to relax your body and prime it for sleep. So if you’re going to bed at 10-11pm, set aside 30 minutes to an hour for an identical nightly pre-sleep routine. This may involve things such as taking a shower, washing your face and brushing your teeth, moisturising your face, putting on your PJs and climbing into bed with a book. Psychologist Susanna Halonen says, ‘The more identical you can make every evening, the more you train your body to prepare for sleep and the easier it will be to achieve.’
Keep a cork in it
‘Alcohol is a stimulant as well as a sedative,’ says Dr Guy Meadows of The Sleep School. ‘While many people use it to fall asleep, it is also metabolised so quickly that it can leave the body craving more.’ So when we drink alcohol close to bedtime, we are more likely to wake up in the early hours, leaving us primed for a night-time anxiety attack. As a rule of thumb, it takes an hour to process one unit of alcohol, so to be on the safe side, have a last glass of wine at 7pm if you intend to go to bed at 10pm.

Soak it up

Taking a relaxing bath can help de-clutter the mind. Try a few drops of Therapy Relaxing Bath Essence – one that contains lavender, which is a natural sleep aid. There’s an added benefit to bath time, too: the fall in body temperature we experience when we get out of the bath is a signal for the brain to start producing sleep-inducing melatonin.
Breathe and let go
Practising deep breathing can distract your mind from worries, explains Dr Ramlakhan. ‘Breathe in, hold for a few seconds and then breathe out – do this three times. Just follow the breathing as you do it.’ Breathing in this way instantly slows everything down, relaxes the mind and body, and helps channel your energy into the breathing action. The breathing will give way to the tiredness, which will overcome anxiety and help you fall asleep.
Junk the caffeine
Avoid caffeine after 2pm, suggests Will Williams. ‘Caffeine is a powerful stimulant, and it takes six hours for our body to recover from a single cup of tea or coffee. If you feel you need a hit of caffeine to get you through the afternoon, then consider learning to meditate to give you more energy throughout the day.’

That’s all for this week. I will continue with nighttime anxiety next week.

Until then have a great week and smile more. It makes you feel so much better.

Take care

Jon X

Jon Adkin BAHyp Hypnotherapist.

Extracts from ‘Can I change‘ by Jon Adkin BAHyp Available from Amazon 

Book Cover

Morning Anxiety.

Hi.

How did you get on with the affirmations last week? The feedback that I got was all positive, so thank you for that. This week I want to blog about morning Anxiety. Yes it is a thing.

Do you ever experience racing thoughts or anxiety in the morning before you even have a chance to hit snooze on your alarm? If you do, you’re not alone.

Do-you-need-to-get-more-sleep

What is morning anxiety?

Although not a medical term, morning anxiety refers to waking up with feelings of stress and worry. If you are dealing with excessive anxiety, worry, and stress in the morning, there’s a good chance you may also have generalized anxiety.
Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is characterized by excessive and uncontrolled worry that pervades daily life and occurs frequently for at least six months. People with GAD typically worry about everyday actives such as work, money, family, and health.

What are the symptoms of morning anxiety?

The symptoms of morning anxiety often mimic those of generalized anxiety disorder. If you are struggling with anxiety upon waking, you may be experiencing: feeling restless, “on-edge,” or “wound up” irritability fatigue. Signs of a panic attack, such as tight chest, tense muscles, higher than normal heart rate, or difficulty breathing
difficulty concentrating and finding your mind goes blank
difficulty controlling the worry or nervousness.

What causes morning anxiety?

Morning anxiety can be caused by many factors that may also contribute to an anxiety disorder. Since morning anxiety is a reaction to excess stress and worries, there are several potential causes that may contribute to your symptoms.
The “stress hormone” cortisol is released by the adrenal glands in response to fear or stress. Researchers have studied the cortisol awakening response (CAR) and have found that cortisol is highest in the first hour of waking for people with an increased level of stress in their lives. This helps explain why you may experience an increase in anxiety in the morning.
What you eat and drink first thing in the morning can also contribute to higher levels of anxiety in the early hours of the day. Did you know that Caffeine and sugar can increase anxiety symptoms. But low blood sugar due to a lack of food can make anxiety symptoms worse.
If you go to bed worrying or wake up during the night with anxious thoughts, you are likely to feel anxious and concerned about your day in the morning.

How is morning anxiety treated?

Living with an anxiety disorder can feel like a never-ending cycle of worry. But it doesn’t have to take over your life. You can learn ways to cope with your symptoms. Some of the more common ways to treat morning anxiety include:

Lifestyle Changes.
Many lifestyle changes can help you manage morning anxiety, including:
getting enough sleep
limiting alcohol and caffeine (both can trigger anxiety and panic attacks)
eating a healthy diet that limits processed food and sugar
reducing stress at work and home.
There are also self-care strategies you can use right when you wake up feeling anxious. This includes:
Physical activity. Exercise is one of the best things you can do for yourself in the morning, especially if you are dealing with an excessive amount of worry when you wake up. Any physical activity, such as taking a walk, can:
lift your mood
reduce anxiety symptoms
improve your body’s ability to handle stress
help you relax
Aim to exercise at least five days per week for 30–45 minutes each session.

Deep breathing exercises

Deep breathing done first thing in the morning can help take the focus off of your negative and anxious thoughts and turn your focus and energy toward your body.

Challenging negative thoughts.

If you wake up with negative thoughts about your day (often called “awfulizing”) challenge them and focus on what you can control. You can keep a journal by your bed and write down what you are grateful for. It’s also a good idea to list at least three things you are looking forward to.

thought-catalog-728536-unsplash

 

Don’t fight it.

If you’re new to these techniques and you’re finding that managing morning anxiety is a lot harder than you thought, try setting a worry timer. Give yourself a time limit of 10 minutes to experience those feelings. When the timer goes off, move on to your self-care strategies. Though you can’t expect to simply “turn off” your anxiety, this approach allows you to acknowledge your worry and gives you a concrete point at which to move on to self-care.
Even though the symptoms of morning anxiety can feel overwhelming and permanent, they are highly treatable. When you combine professional treatment along with the self-care strategies listed above, you can experience relief from the racing thoughts and worry that invade your mind.

In conclusion for mornings

Start a morning routine.
When I started an effective morning routine and stuck to it, I was able to massively reduce my anxiety. In addition, it also helped with my productivity, energy, relationships, and a host of other areas of my life. It really was life-changing.
10 Things You Can Do to Naturally Heal Your Anxiety
Wake Up Early : According to Hannah Hepworth, an expert on natural anxiety relief, “when you wake up early you can have plenty of time to get where you need to go. Instead of rushing and yelling…you can work calmly.”
Make Your Bed : The reason making your bed is so powerful is that it allows you to successfully complete a task first thing in the morning, which then builds momentum to continue doing more for the rest of the day.
Repeat your daily affirmation : If you can look in a mirror, smile and say your daily affirmation. Say it with meaning and belief.
Take a Cold Shower : This sounds awful. In fact, when I first heard about it I didn’t try it for months because I didn’t think it could help and I loathed the idea of taking a freezing, cold shower. However, after 3-months of consistently taking a cold shower every morning, I can ensure you the benefits are enormous. The easiest recipe to get the psychological lift is by taking a cold shower for 2 to 3 minutes once or twice daily, preceded by a five-minute gradual adaptation to the temperature (i.e. start your shower hot and then finish it with 2–3 minutes of pure icy goodness). Only taking a cold shower can strengthen your body’s parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems, increase proper circulation of blood through your body, and contract your muscles to eliminate toxins and poisonous wastes.

Placeholder Image

Coffee, Tea, or Your Breakfast Drink of Choice : Until recently, my mornings would always start with a cup of coffee. I have been consuming the beverage ever since I can remember, and I never wanted to lose that, but there came a point where I knew that healing my anxiety was much more important than the benefits of coffee. So I went cold turkey. Give it a try, but leave your phone at home. Just embrace your surrounds and be grateful that you woke up this morning.
Brain Dump at Desk : “Could bitching and moaning on paper for 5 minutes each day change your life? As crazy as it may seem, I believe the answer is yes.” -Tim Ferriss
Gratitude : The key here is not to repeat that you are grateful for your family, life. The key is to focus on being aware of the smaller things in life that you would miss if you were gone. This is a very pow-erful practice . Dr. Emmons, a gratitude researcher, confirms that practicing gratitude daily can reduce anxiety and depression.
The Morning Three
1. Affirmations—By stating three affirmations in the morning I am able to put myself into a charged state. It may seem strange, but it has been hugely beneficial to my mental state.
2. What do I get to enjoy today—By starting my day thinking about what I get to enjoy today, I put my mind into a positive mode and trigger my brain to see the upside of the day.
3. Daily Intention — I start out each day with intention. Whether it’s as simple as “I will be present today” or “I will choose to see the beauty in everything that happens to me today.” It doesn’t really matter, but I have found it extremely helpful for lowering my daily anxiety to be intentional about what I want my day’s purpose to be,

MITs:

Three Most Important Tasks that need to get done Even a basic plan of attack for your day can drastically reduce your anxiety by decreasing the cognitive load that comes with increased decision making. Each morning we wake up with a finite amount of brain power and every decision we make detracts from it. By having a basic structure that decreases the number of decisions you have to make about what you are going to do next, you will be able to take control of your day and calm your restless mind.”
1. What task, if completed successfully, will make all of the others obsolete?
2. What task do I have the most anxiety/fear about?
3. What task will move me closest to accomplishing my number 1 goal?
Deep Work: Do all of the above. Make it work for you.
I understand we all have different schedules and responsibilities, but if we want to overcome anxiety and move our goals forward truly we must protect our mornings. If we don’t take control of our mornings, something else will.

Hope that made sense. Until next time.

Have a great week

Jon X

These recent blogs are taken from my paperback Can I Change? Available from Amazon in Paperback or Kindle version.

Jon Adkin BAHyp Hypnotherapist

 

This is still me.

Hi Welcome back.

So continuing where we left off in last week in last weeks blog After leaving the hospital feeling a bit sorry for myself I jumped around jobs as I never had a plan B. (Kids, always have a plan B) More dislocations meant more time doing nothing. but I didn’t like to sit around doing nothing I got a job designing kitchens which I enjoyed for many years until… my other shoulder started to dislocate. This meant more ops, more time in plaster. Now I never was a fan of daytime TV Kilroy (The Jeremy Kyle of its day) never did it for me. so I offered my services to my sons school, helping with reading, art etc. The head teacher use to pick me up in the morning (She was not a great driver bless her) and I would jump on the school bus at the end of the day. She then employed me as the midday assistant. in the end, that stop gap lasted 26 years. raising to the heights of ICT Manager. Now during my time at the school I suffered even more illness. I had two heart attacks, 2 strokes and a few more dislocations. On paper I was a mess.

Now as much as I loved working with the kids, due to the illnesses and constant hospital visits (bearing in mind I was still in my 30s at this time) I lost my confidence and self worth. Looking back I was dipping into depression and I needed to do something about it. Yes life had dealt me a bad hand but I had two choices. Curl up on the sofa and give up or pull myself together and make the most of life. I chose to do the latter, but I needed help.

I went to W H Smith (No Amazon back then. Yes I am that old) and I bought myself Paul McKennas Self hypnosis books. Little did I know that would not only change my life but it would eventually guide me to my career today.

Not only did that book and the videos. Yes videos (do you remember videos? if not ask your Mum or Dad) They not only helped me get back on track they actually made me even more confident and full of self belief. Thanks to Paul I was back, better than ever.

All them years ago I never ever thought I would one day be a professional Hypnotherapist, but I like to study and read, so I continued to buy Paul’s books and became more and more intrigued as to why hypnosis did what it did.  I read lots of books and watched some DVD’s (yep we have moved on ) and then about 4 years ago I decided to train. never intending to do it as a career, I was just interested.

I studied, I worked with volunteers, I even roped my reluctant son in to help me. The more I did, the more I enjoyed it. I could do it.  I could really do it.

I qualified as a Hypnotherapist and I was so proud of myself. I had set myself a goal and I had reached it. this was the start of a whole new chapter of my life.

jon-tyson-XzUMBNmQro0-unsplash

Now I finished last weeks blog with a question. Did I make it as an entertainer? Well yes and no. Not in the way that I had envisaged I wrote Children’s books. The Adventures of Carla Bear. (6 in the set so far)  and over the years in the school I dressed up in many many guises and entertained the kids. I ran some of the school discos and every Summer fete and Christmas Bazaar I was there behind the mic. I even proved the Doctors wrong and I played the drums again. I couldn’t do 4 hour gigs like I use to, but I could play again and for years I taught the kids at school drums.  I loved my time at the school and seeing the kids flourish but it was time for a change.

A big change.

I started to offer my hypnotherapy services on evenings and weekends and I was really pleased in the way it was received. I had found a new purpose in life. I love to help people and the buzz that I was getting was making me want to do more.

So I did.

cropped-name-logo-for-video.png

I bit the bullet and I left the school. I didn’t have any support but what I did have is a lot of self belief and confidence. I know I could make it work, I believed in me.  It’s now approaching nearly 2 years since I made that jump. The house has not been repossessed, I’m not starving and actually I’m having more holidays than I ever did before. I’m making it work.

I have a lot of happy clients as you can see from my testimonial page. I’m helping others to make the changes in their lives and that makes me happy.

Moral of this story. Set yourself goals and reach them. Believe in yourself and have the confidence to go forward. You will make mistakes, but learn from them, don’t look back.

Until next time

Jon XX

 

 

What can it do for you?

Hi.

If you are a regular reader of my blog (and there are some of you) you know that I am a hypnotherapist. and an EFT/TFT Tapping practitioner  So last night I got talking to someone and the question arose “Well what could you do for me?” and the answer is lots actually.

You don’t have to be overweight, or a smoker or an anxiety sufferer to want to visit a hypnotherapist. We can can help you with so many aspects of your life and modern living. It’s not all about fears and Phobias.

Let me give you some examples, (and just so you know names, dates and possibly genders are changed in these case studies. to protect clients).

Case Study 1:

Client was feeling totally worthless and life had no purpose.

2 sessions with the client showed them that they were not worthless and that their life definitely had a purpose. We worked together on building their self worth, made them feel that they can handle what life throws at them, seeing new challenges as a way of growth. followed by reinventing their outlook on life. Replacing those damaging negative thoughts with more positive constructive thoughts.

Outcome:

This was 7 months ago. I met the client in town just last week.  I saw him before he saw me. He was smiling, his body language shouted confidence and he looked happy. When he saw me he came straight over with his NEW partner. (There wasn’t one at the time of the sessions) and he introduced her to me. He can’t believe the change in himself and he is now full of optimism for his future.

Room 2

Case Study 2:

Client was struggling with anger issues.

3 sessions booked in. Did some emotional release as to the root of the anger. then worked with the client showing them that they can release that anger before a hand is raised. then did some future pacing using visualisation. showing the client what life will be like once their anger is under control, their control.

Outcome:

Life has become so much more peaceful at home. and their partner is not living on their nerves anymore if they go out for a drink. The client is so much calmer and does not get angry over things that use to make them snap.

Case study 3:

Relationship breakdown.

My client came to me because of a relationship breakdown and didn’t feel that they could move on. we booked in 3 sessions and in those 3 sessions we used a method that I have in my toolbox called The Blueprint. It’s a fantastic content free protocol that will help shift negativity, unwanted thoughts, past trauma etc then once we have cleared those thoughts, those patterns of behaviour we start on rebuilding the confidence and self belief which is always in you. It just gets covered over and we tend to forget that we are in control of our thoughts and beliefs.

Outcome.

6 months later. a very happy independent person who now knows they don’t have to rely on others and can very much be their own person. They are dipping their toe back into the dating scene but with a new found confidence.

Here is a link to my testimonial page. I love to receive feedback and to see how my clients are doing.

So you see. It’s not just about fear of flying or fear of heights etc etc . It’s all about you and making you the best that you possibly can be.

I love this work and the satisfaction that it brings. Seeing the long term change in my clients makes me feel so pleased and proud that I could help them.

Pie

 

So why did I get into it, I hear you ask. (Go on someone ask please)… I will tell you. Because it saved me. In my 30s (I’m 57 now) I had some major illnesses. 2 heart attacks 2 mini strokes and various medical procedures. I lost my confidence my self belief and my mojo. So I had a decision to make I could have curled up on the sofa and watched Kilroy (the then equivalent of the Jeremy Kyle show) or I could pull myself together.

I did the latter. I started with self hypnosis books. Thanks Paul Mckenna. then as time went on not only did I regain all my confidence back I exceeded where I wanted to be. So a few years back I decided to train to become a hypnotherapist. Not intending to do it as a career I just wanted to know why it made a world of difference for me.

So I trained and the more I did the more I loved it. Not only could I do it I was bloody good at it (yep, blowing my own trumpet here) So I qualified and I started doing it in the evenings alongside my proper job. However the more I did, the more I loved it and the buzz from helping people was amazing so I took a leap of faith nearly 2 years ago and went full time.

I have not looked back. (Well I have but I fell over so I won’t be doing that again)

I believed in me and I got that from hypnotherapy and that’s why when you come and see me you can see the passion and the enthusiasm that I have, and having been there I know I can get you back on track.

So that’s my little story for this week. Next week I will blogging about ???? who know’s I just sit down and see what comes. however what I do know is that it will be of benefit to you the reader in some way. as that’s what I like doing. I like helping people.

Until next time

Have a great week

Jon X

Ps. I’ve also written a few books(Search Jon Adkin on Amazon) and painted a few pictures