They didn’t teach us this!

So I trained to become a hypnotherapist. I worked really hard, I learnt loads. The history and thinking behind my new skill. Lots of different techniques and I worked with case studies to perfect my art. I qualified, my door was open now bring on the clients. Hello I said bring on the clients.

Oh hang on, we have to find our own clients. They didn’t tell us that bit. How many therapists feel like this? Not just therapists, but anyone that offers a service and aim to get business across social media.

Now, I am one of the lucky ones because having an IT background I understand about algorithms and how they work ( well a lot of the time I do). However so many therapists don’t have an IT knowledge. Where does that leave them?

We ask friends and family to like and share our page, which they do, but is there really any prospect of them becoming a paying client? The answer is no not really. They are showing their support but that isn’t going to pay the bills. So now what? Well you have to start posting regularly on your chosen platforms, but what do you post? how do you get likes? Will they share my post? Do I need to pay for likes? HELP!

I need help.

Help is around, but what I have found that there are a lot of marketeers trying to sell you the same package that they sell to a plumber, a car salesman, a painter and decorator. what do they really know about the therapy business? As therapists we face problems over and above other services.

  • People are scared to like posts as it shows their name and their friends may notice.
  • Therapy of any sort still has a stigma attached to it so people don’t tend to share.
  • What we do is all a bit Woo Woo. According to some. We know it isn’t, we know it works. but how do we prove that if we can’t attract clients?
  • The chances of your post getting in front of a client at exactly the right moment is very very slim.
  • People don’t like admitting they have a problem so are reluctant to ask for help.
  • The list goes on.

So what can we do. Ahh. Well that’s where I can help. You see I’ve only been full time just over 3 years now but in that time I have been lucky enough to stay busy and have a constant flow of clients. I have been able to do this as I understand how to get the best out of Facebook, Instagram and social media in general, and the best thing is that I did it on a zero budget.

So what I have done is compiled a 50+ page manual aimed at therapists, but will help anyone that offers a service to raise their awareness on social media, and in doing so will get your name out there and keep it out there until your client is ready, and when they are ready they contact you and become a new paying client.

Perhaps you may find that missing piece.

I will be selling this manual for just £49.00 but it is filled with tips and advice on how to post, what to post, when to post and about creating an identity on social media. I let you know the costly mistakes that I made, so that you don’t make them and I also point you in the direction of some excellent free software or apps that are my go to when posting.

What Can Social Media Do For You?

A helpful manual for therapists and small business to create a better presences on social media. SEPTEMBER SPECIAL OFFER JUST £49.00

£49.00

You do not need a PayPal account to pay via Paypal.

I’m not going to promise you a major influx of clients or that you will be earning £50k plus by Christmas but as long as you make some of the suggested tweaks, and make it your own, you will see a rise in your social media presence.

If you are reading this and want to know more please feel free to email me at jadkin.bahyp@gmail.com or see my Facebook page I’m doing this to help and support therapists and small businesses that have just survived a very tough time. As I say I’m not a marketeer, I’m just someone who understands what you are going through.

I want to turn on that light at the end of the tunnel for you.

Until next week, or possibly the week after 🙂

Have a great week or two.

Take care and stay safe.

Jon X

Hypnotherapy in Suffolk, Essex and Cambridge. and online via Zoom

Jon Adkin Author of ‘Can I Change?’ Available from Amazon. and 100 days in isolation. A collection of funny original images of one mans decent into comic madness during lockdown

Find me on You TubeFacebook and Instagram.

Are you ready to leave lockdown?

Hi, Welcome to this weeks blog.

I opened my doors for one to one last week, working within the Government guidelines of social distancing. The response has been great, and I thank anyone who I have seen since I opened.

What I have noticed from the messages and the phone conversations that I’ve received this week is that there seems to be a whole new lot of problems that have arisen because of Covid-19. I think because of the lockdown new issues have raised their heads, some serious some not so serious. The not so serious were things like, My next door neighbours cat meows too loud, or I slept for 3 hours in the afternoon and I can’t get to sleep at night, and many more. What the lockdown has done is heightened senses. We have become more aware of things going on around us. We have also got out of routines, So taking a 3 hour sleep in the afternoon is of course going to disrupt your usual sleep pattern.

We are slowly coming out of lockdown, so perhaps next week you need to start getting back into a routine. You could start by getting out of your PJ’s or your trackies. Start dressing normally again.

Reintroduce your old routine 

If you’re preparing to start going back into the office or do the school run, it’s a good idea to start easing back into your old routine now. Set your alarm for the time you would normally get up and go to bed at the time you did pre-lockdown. 

If you have a household with children, that means getting the whole family back onto this timezone too. Go through the motions of your old routine too – get showered and dressed and do your hair as if you were going into the office. 

‘Also – ensure you create a sense of weekdays and weekends by focussing on chores and work during the week and relaxation time for weekends – just as you used to do. This all helps to create a sense of confidence that we are ready to readjust and resets our body clocks in preparation for the event.

Suggest a catch up on Zoom

Suggest a Zoom work catch-up 

One of the most common anxieties I hear from people in my practice, is the thought of going back to work and having face to face meetings or social interaction

To help reduce anxiety around this, reach out to work colleagues – FaceTime them – ahead of going back to work. This will significantly help to alleviate some of your fears as you reconnect with them and you’ll feel that much more confident about your long-awaited physical interaction with them. 

‘You could even suggest a Zoom call with a group of colleagues to create a sense of togetherness and establish your sense of community.

Re-introduce your work wardrobe 

The clothes we wear affect our mood, confidence, attitudes and even the way we behave and interact with people. So now – more than ever – think of this as your psychological armour for        re-entering the world. 

‘Many of us have been living in a uniform of comfy sweats and elasticated waist trousers for what feels like an eternity but it’s time to go through your wardrobe and create your capsule ‘back to the world’ key looks.  Even invest in a few new pieces if it helps you feel good. Not only will this mentally empower you, it removes a huge amount of pressure and stress when the day finally comes – it’s one less thing to think about. And simplicity is key in reducing anxiety.

Start cutting down now.

Reduce your screen time 

The trepidation and confusion caused by information overload is a huge contributor towards anxiety levels. As you prepare to go back into the outside world, take stock and account of the amount of screen time you spend browsing social media and news sites. 

Many of us have increased our intake of social media sites and that has caused a massive increase in anxiety rates. Children also need to be told not to spend so much time on You Tube and Tik Tok etc. If you start to reduce their viewing times now, it won’t come as so much of a shock when normality finally returns. Limit your own screen time to once or twice daily and be aware of the people or information sources that create a feeling of dread – avoid these. Especially on days when you’re feeling high levels of anxiety.

If you find zoom chats exhausting you’re not alone. Video calls can be harder to navigate in many ways than face to face interactions, because we are so focused on seeing our own face. 

‘It can also feel rather overwhelming when everyone is talking at the same time. Instead of solely relying on Zoom, get back into the habit of speaking to people you care about on the phone.’

Strike up a conversation with a stranger

Walk your dog or your child where you know you’ll find other people, such as in the park, whilst maintaining social distancing. Give yourself an exercise each day to strike up a conversation with someone you don’t know – even from a few metres away. 

‘Having been locked up at home for weeks, we are used to giving people a wide berth and it’s easy to feel a sense of fear and mistrust when we see someone new. Get back into the habit of smiling and making eye contact, rather than leaping into the nearest hedge when someone approaches.’

Another option is to set up a chair by your front door and talk to people as they pass. Setting up a chair at your front door with a cuppa or a glass of wine and chat to people walking past, can be very enjoyable, Connecting with people, from the safety of your garden or balcony, or even an open window is a good first step to re-socialising, plus you may even make friends new people in your neighbourhood. 

Although it may feel strange at first, don’t focus on your own feelings of awkwardness. Instead, focus on the fact that your friendliness could brighten up someone else’s day.

And finally for this week.

Equip yourself with a mask and podcast for the first commute 

‘It’s important to differentiate that, for most people, the fear of going outside of the house is not rooted in the action of going outside in itself – it’s the fear of becoming infected.

‘Naturally, the idea of boarding public transport or a cramped commuter train where we are not in control of social distancing nor has it been effectively enforced, is enough to send us over the edge and into panic attack territory. It’s so important to gear yourself up for this mentally if you have no choice but to use public transport. Beyond the basics of equipping yourself with a protective mask, gloves and hand sanitiser, download your favourite podcasts or playlist that helps to relax and transport you to a place of calm or take a book to read.

I wish you all a safe and health week. Until next time

Take care, Best wishes

Jon X

Hypnotherapy in Suffolk, Essex and Cambridge.

Jon Adkin Author of ‘Can I Change?’ Available from Amazon.

Find me on You TubeFacebook and Instagram.

Plan for the future

As much as it may feel like it, this will not last forever. So, what better way to feel less alone then to plan what you will do when isolation is finally over!  

Make a future fun list with all the places you would like to go when lockdown is lifted. Plan a trip for you and your family or friends, or make a bucket list of places that you would you like to go in your lifetime, it might seem silly it will help you focus on a time that is a little more enjoyable.

Connect with others

perhaps, the most important way to combat loneliness in self isolation he’s connecting with other people. However, instead of sending a text or jumping on Facebook why not send a postcard or a letter? Hello

you will have fun writing it, and you will brighten up someone’s day.

Do something meaningful

losing your sense of purpose can be a huge factor in feeling lonely. All of us wants to feel like we are doing something meaningful and that can be difficult whilst your having to stay at home.

only you know what will give you meaning, but if you are struggling for ideas why not volunteer through a local charity or group or perhaps start an online course.  

Get online

The Internet, when used correctly, to make you feel less lonely. There are so many amazing apps and communities available to help combat loneliness. Here are some suggestions.

Zoom or FaceTime friends and family, you could have a quiz night or dinner date. The possibilities are endless. Join a forum or Facebook group of a hobby that you love, Or join quarantine chat, a service specifically set up to help people connect doing lockdown.

I Got online and offer online sessions

Want some more ideas, how to pass the time in lockdown? How about some of these.

Tour ancient Rome

You may feel cut off from the rest of the world, but you can time travel. 

Current technology means that you can explore other cities and even other times online, such as this virtual tour of ancient Rome which takes you through the forum, capitoline hill, and famous monuments.

Enjoy the Musée d’Orsay

Experiencing these venues from your home does mean that you can visit multiple galleries from different countries or even different continents in the same afternoon. 

Paris’ Musée d’Orsay is home to an incredible collection of Van Gogh and Cezanne’s artistic masterpieces. Take a look around online. 

 Pop into the Tate

Perhaps once you’ve enjoyed Florence, New York, and Paris, you can come to London to see the Tate Britain for free. 

Although you’ll miss out on the lovely river walk to the gallery, you can drop in at any time and see your favourite pieces from the comfort of your own home.  

Experience the British Museum

The British Museum is home to incredible artefacts from around the world and is still open to virtual visitors. 

Exhibits that are usually packed are free to roam around at any time, so you can brush up on your Egyptian knowledge, see the controversial Parthenon Marbles, or just wile away a few hours. 

Go to 500 other museums or galleries 

If you’re still looking for more galleries or museums to visit, Google’s arts and culture collection has virtual tours of 500 top attractions around the world, including national galleries from around the world, individual artist museums, and even the Eiffel Tower.

Throwback.

Have a karaoke night 

Missing karaoke night with your friends? You can still do it from home. 

Apps like AirConsole let you turn your smartphone into a mic, and sing your favourite hits with the usual gang and practice new songs to sing at the bar once lockdown is lifted. 

Try a fitness challenge

Missing the gym? There are plenty of fitness challenges you can try out from home, so you can emerge from lockdown fitter, leaner, or stronger. 

You could try the 100 pushup challengesquat challenge, or just doing a 30-day bodyweight workout challenge to stay healthy at home for free. 

Just make sure that you don’t push too hard early on, and warm up thoroughly before you do any exercise. 

Arrange a Houseparty 

If you still want to meet with your friends – do it at a virtual Houseparty

The app allows for large group video chats so you can get together for a drink, a chat, or just to see some friendly faces for a couple of hours. 

Play a board game

Board game lovers will be pleased to know that there are ways to play your favourite games online, so you don’t have to wait for the lockdown to end to try out your new Scythe strategy or to finally play Terraforming Mars with a friend. 

Websites like Tabletopia have free accounts for players, but you may need to pay to play some of the more popular or newer games. 

Learn a language

Always wanted to speak Italian? Intrigued by Norwegian? Think that Mandarin will be useful for work, or perhaps German

Lockdown gives you plenty of time to dedicate to learning a new language, brushing up on vocabulary, and testing out pronunciation.

Go to the aquarium

It’s almost impossible to recreate the strange grace and tranquility of aquariums but not entirely.

Although they’re closed to the public, Monterey Bay Aquarium have added a number of live cams to let you keep an eye on the jellyfish, kelp forest, coral reef, and even the penguins, completely free. 

Deep clean your house

Between dusty skirting boards, dirty tiling, and stained carpets, your home can offer days of distraction if you feel like doing that deep clean you’ve been putting off. 

There are plenty of online cleaning guides if the task looks too big, and focusing on one room at a time will help you divide up the work. 

Declutter your home

Being stuck at home can make you rethink how much of your stuff you really need. 

Do you really wear all the clothes spilling out of your wardrobe? And do you think you’ll really re-read those GCSE essays sitting in a box upstairs? You can decide what to donate and what to throw out, ready for a full clear out when the lockdown is lifted. 

Volunteer 

Sometimes the best way to get out of your head is to help other people. You may have some local groups that are focused on helping the vulnerable or isolated during lockdown. 

Learn first aid

It’s good to be prepared for an emergency, especially when urgent care centres are overwhelmed or you may not want to leave self-isolation for a relatively minor injury. 

You can learn basic first aid online, for free with FutureLearn. 

Another throw Back

Discover your roots

Wonder where your family was in the flu pandemic of 1918? 

Tracing your family tree can unearth lost memories or even distant relatives. Start by learning about genealogy and you can discover more about yourself and your background. 

Have a kitchen dance party

You can definitely have too much screen time. If workouts aren’t your thing or you just miss a good dance, put together a list of your favourite songs and dance around your kitchen. 

Don’t worry, nobody’s watching! 

I hope that has given you some ideas. We maybe on the home stretch now but even after lockdown is lifted, there is no reason why you can’t carry on any of these activities that you have enjoyed.

Until next week.

Stay safe, stay healthy.

Jon X

Hypnotherapy in Suffolk, Essex and Cambridge.

Jon Adkin Author of ‘Can I Change?’ Available from Amazon.

Find me on You TubeFacebook and Instagram.

Just checking in

Hi. A different type of blog today. I’ve noticed that the lock down is starting to take it’s toll on some people. So today I want to offer you a weekly mental health check in.

Feelings.

Set an alarm on your phone, or a reminder in your calendar, so at a set time each week you can quickly do a check in on a scale from 0(‘not at all’) to 10 (‘extremely’) of how stressed, anxious or down you are feeling.

Body

Take a moment to notice any tension in your body like tight shoulders, chest or jaws. Other signs that you might be feeling stressed include dryness of the mouth, difficulty breathing, and a racing heart.

Sleep

If you are constantly struggling to get to sleep, waking in the night,waking earlier than usual and/or finding it difficult to get back to sleep, these are signs your mind is unable to switch off and relax.

Thoughts

Are you worrying about the worst-case scenarios? Focusing on the ‘what-if’ scenarios is not useful and is best to try to limit this as much as possibe.

Reactions and behaviour

If you find yourself frequently snapping at those you love, finding it extremely difficult to focus, or always depending on things like alcohol or food to cope. It is time to prioritise your mental wellbeing.

Check in buddy

Choose a check in buddy. This may be your partner, housemate or even a friend or colleague you’re keeping in touch with via social media or face time etc. Be honest with yourself and with them about how you are coping.

I sadly can’t see you one to one at the moment but I am offering Online sessions if you need that little bit of extra help.

Be kind to others.

How we can cope with lock down.

We are social animals, So how will we stop getting lonely and crazy as we distance ourselves socially and self-isolate? Well, our first motto should be: “Don’t waste a crisis!” If we are imaginative, we will find silver linings in these very dark clouds. We can experiment with new ways of living. These won’t just help us cope with the emergency. they actually can help us to enjoy it.

Virtual coffees, lunches and dinners

Using face time or What’s app create a group and have a coffee morning. Have a good old chat, moan and more importantly a laugh.

Sing and dance

The Italians are keeping their spirits up by singing from their balconies. But they don’t have a monopoly on bel canto. or how about remote dancing. Friends in Italy are already using an app called House Party to have virtual parties. let’s use the technology for good.

On yer bike

Public transport isn’t safe. So for short distances, why not walk? And for middling distances,as part of your daily exercise, why not bike? It’s also a good way to keep fit.

Virtual gyms

So many personal trainers are offering work outs for all ages and all fitness levels. Find one that suits you and make it a routine.

Enjoy some happy memories

Time to reflect

Most people’s lives are dictated by routines: take the kids to school, rush to work, endless emails, get home, crash. The rat race isn’t great. But sitting around home twiddling our thumbs won’t be much fun either. So we need new routines.

Every morning, I have started to say out loud 5 things I am grateful for. Every evening I do the same and think why they are meaningful. These habits provide bookends to my day and help me make the most of what happens in between. I’ve also used my music streaming service and I’m listening to all the albums that made a mark on my life. (boy, some of them are crap when you re-listen), but that is what makes it a great thing to do.

Deepen our friendships

Much of the time, we’re too busy to think deeply about our friends and family. But now we’ll have more time. We can use some of it to think about what our loved ones really need and then help them get it… remotely. this time also shows who the true friends are. The ones who check in on you, the ones who make you smile. The ones who care.

Enjoy a good book

Virtual book groups

People will also have time to read. But that can be a lonely activity – and we get more intellectual stimulation if we share our ideas with others. How about when you finish a book, type out your thoughts and send them to friends to provoke discussion. Why not go further and organise virtual book groups?

Connect with far-away friends

Just because you’re not in the same room doesn’t mean you can’t have a deep friendship. Indeed, the virus offers an opportunity to connect with those who live far away. After all, if you are distancing yourself physically from others, it doesn’t matter whether they are in London, Cayman or Milan. The more we reach across the world and show we care for one another, the more we’ll help defeat that other terrible virus: nationalism.

Other people will have different ideas about how to make the most of this virus crisis. We can all experience the pleasure of inventing and experimenting with new ways of living.

Until next week. Stay safe, stay healthy.

Best wishes

Jon X

Hypnotherapy in Suffolk, Essex and Cambridge.

Jon Adkin Author of ‘Can I Change?’ Available from Amazon.

Find me on You TubeFacebook and Instagram.

Are you positive?

H. Welcome to this weeks blog. All about positive thinking. So my first question to you is do you see yourself as a positive thinker? Do you see the problem or do you look for the solution?

You know the old question. Is your glass half-empty or half-full? How you answer this age-old question about positive thinking may reflect your outlook on life, your attitude toward yourself, and whether you’re optimistic or pessimistic — and it may even affect your health.

Indeed, some studies show that personality traits such as optimism and pessimism can affect many areas of your health and well-being. The positive thinking that usually comes with optimism is a key part of effective stress management. And effective stress management is associated with many health benefits. If you tend to be pessimistic, don’t despair — you can learn positive thinking skills.

Understanding positive thinking and self-talk

Positive thinking doesn’t mean that you keep your head in the sand and ignore life’s less pleasant situations. Positive thinking just means that you approach unpleasantness in a more positive and productive way. You think the best is going to happen, not the worst.

Positive thinking often starts with self-talk. Self-talk is the endless stream of unspoken thoughts that run through your head. These automatic thoughts can be positive or negative. Some of your self-talk comes from logic and reason. Other self-talk may arise from misconceptions that you create because of lack of information.

If the thoughts that run through your head are mostly negative, your outlook on life is more likely pessimistic. If your thoughts are mostly positive, you’re likely an optimist — someone who practices positive thinking.

Did you know there are health benefits to positive thinking.

The health benefits of positive thinking

Researchers continue to explore the effects of positive thinking and optimism on health. Health benefits that positive thinking may provide include:

  • Increased life span
  • Lower rates of depression
  • Lower levels of distress
  • Greater resistance to the common cold
  • Better psychological and physical well-being
  • Better cardiovascular health and reduced risk of death from cardiovascular disease
  • Better coping skills during hardships and times of stress

It’s unclear why people who engage in positive thinking experience these health benefits. One theory is that having a positive outlook enables you to cope better with stressful situations, which reduces the harmful health effects of stress on your body.

It’s also thought that positive and optimistic people tend to live healthier lifestyles — they get more physical activity, follow a healthier diet, and don’t smoke or drink alcohol in excess.

Stop thinking those negative thoughts.

Identifying negative thinking

Not sure if your self-talk is positive or negative? Some common forms of negative self-talk include:

  • Filtering. You magnify the negative aspects of a situation and filter out all of the positive ones. For example, you had a great day at work. You completed your tasks ahead of time and were complimented for doing a speedy and thorough job. That evening, you focus only on your plan to do even more tasks and forget about the compliments you received.
  • Personalizing. When something bad occurs, you automatically blame yourself. For example, you hear that an evening out with friends is canceled, and you assume that the change in plans is because no one wanted to be around you.
  • Catastrophizing. You automatically anticipate the worst. The drive-through coffee shop gets your order wrong and you automatically think that the rest of your day will be a disaster.
  • Polarizing. You see things only as either good or bad. There is no middle ground. You feel that you have to be perfect or you’re a total failure.

Focusing on positive thinking

You can learn to turn negative thinking into positive thinking. The process is simple, but it does take time and practice — you’re creating a new habit, after all. Here are some ways to think and behave in a more positive and optimistic way:

  • Identify areas to change. If you want to become more optimistic and engage in more positive thinking, first identify areas of your life that you usually think negatively about, whether it’s work, your daily commute or a relationship. You can start small by focusing on one area to approach in a more positive way.
  • Check yourself. Periodically during the day, stop and evaluate what you’re thinking. If you find that your thoughts are mainly negative, try to find a way to put a positive spin on them.
  • Be open to humor. Give yourself permission to smile or laugh, especially during difficult times. Seek humor in everyday happenings. When you can laugh at life, you feel less stressed.
  • Follow a healthy lifestyle. Aim to exercise for about 30 minutes on most days of the week. You can also break it up into 10-minute chunks of time during the day. Exercise can positively affect mood and reduce stress. Follow a healthy diet to fuel your mind and body. And learn techniques to manage stress.
  • Surround yourself with positive people. Make sure those in your life are positive, supportive people you can depend on to give helpful advice and feedback. Negative people may increase your stress level and make you doubt your ability to manage stress in healthy ways.
  • Practice positive self-talk. Start by following one simple rule: Don’t say anything to yourself that you wouldn’t say to anyone else. Be gentle and encouraging with yourself. If a negative thought enters your mind, evaluate it rationally and respond with affirmations of what is good about you. Think about things you’re thankful for in your life.
Let those Negative thoughts just pass on by and hold on to the positive thoughts.

Here are some examples of negative self-talk and how you can apply a positive thinking twist to them:

Negative self-talkPositive thinking
I’ve never done it before.It’s an opportunity to learn something new.
It’s too complicated.I’ll tackle it from a different angle.
I don’t have the resources.Necessity is the mother of invention.
I’m too lazy to get this done.I wasn’t able to fit it into my schedule, but I can re-examine some priorities.
There’s no way it will work.I can try to make it work.
It’s too radical a change.Let’s take a chance.
No one bothers to communicate with me.I’ll see if I can open the channels of communication.
I’m not going to get any better at this.I’ll give it another try.

I’m going to carry this on next week talking more about positive thinking.

Have a good week and think positively especially about yourself. Treat yourself as you would your best friend.

Until next week.

Jon X

Jon Adkin BAHyp Hypnotherapist

www,jonadkin.com Based in Haverhill Suffolk, Serving, Suffolk, Essex and Cambridge.

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