Night Night.

Hi. Hope you are having a good week. This week I’m concluding my night time anxiety blog.

Has anyone found any of the tips or advice that I’ve offered helpful? If you have let me know.

So What else can you do to ease the night time anxiety? Theis is a strange one.

Make your worries real

Write down what’s on your mind at least an hour before bed. By committing thoughts to paper, you control them – they no longer control you and live on paper instead of in your head. Mentally, you can tick them off. Dr Guy Meadows suggests giving each worry a nickname, too, such as The Nag. ‘We can’t help these thoughts coming in, but they’re only a problem when they start to consume us,’ he says. ‘By giving them names, you speed up the process of defusion, so when unpleasant thoughts crop up, you can just acknowledge them – oh, there’s The Nag again – and go back to what you’re doing.’

Get moving earlier

Strenuous exercise in the evening may cause your nervous system to be too wired to sleep, says meditation teacher Will Williams. So either restructure your day to exercise in the morning, or use meditation after exercise to calm everything down and bring you back into balance.

Set clear goals

Have a clear plan for the next day, says psychologist Susanna Halonen. ‘If you know what priority number one and two are, you’ll spend less time worrying because you know those are the first two things you’ll get done. The more you turn this into a habit, the more you realise that if you plan ahead and prioritise effectively, the more easily you can get the important things done. This will lower your anxiety and help you sleep better.’

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Curb your cyberenthusiasm

If we’re going to feel worry-free at night, it’s crucially important to have a mental switch-off, says Neil Shah of The Stress Management Society. ‘So have a digital blackout for an hour before bed, unplugging all devices that could stimulate the mind.’ browsing the latest headlines online may feel like light relief, but it actually keeps your brain stimulated. He says, ‘If checking your phone is part of your end-of-day routine, do this at least half an hour before you turn the lights out so you give your eyes and brain a break. Put any electronics out of reach or on airplane mode so you won’t be tempted to pick them up in the night – or if you can, turn them off completely.’
LCD screens emit blue light, which is the same sort as sunlight, so plays havoc with our sleep hormones. ‘Checking Facebook last thing at night is like shining a miniature sun into your eyes,’ says Dr Guy Meadows of The Sleep School. ‘Our body clock gets confused and starts thinking it’s daytime again, so it inhibits the sleep hormone melatonin and releases the waking hormone cortisol.’

Leave the room

If you simply can’t get back to sleep because your head is buzzing with worry, don’t look at the clock – you’ll fret even more. ‘Just get out of bed and go into another room for 10 minutes,’ says Dr Ramlakhan. ‘Leaving the environment you feel uncomfortable in breaks the association with worries. But don’t start checking your phone or scrolling through Facebook.
Go into the living room and under a dim light read a few pages of a light-hearted book, or yesterday’s newspaper. When you feel calm, return to your bed and begin some deep breathing again.’ He adds, ‘Turn your pillow over when you get back into bed. It will feel cooler on your face and creates a separation from the last time you were lying there.’

Anxiety quick tips.

Start Deep-Breathing
If you’re not focused on how to calm your body through slow, intentional belly-breathing, you’re missing out. Belly-breathing is free, location independent, and easy to implement.

Meditate instead of Medicate
Calm is an inside job. Give yourself the gift of serenity and start the day with ten minutes of solitude and positive energy. Think calm, measured and open-minded, and your daily activities will correspond.

Practice Self-Care
Get a massage, a mani-pedi, or a haircut. Nothing says polished and well-maintained like a sexy, healthy glow.

Eliminate fizzy drinks
That morning cup of jcoffee can jumpstart your day and provide warmth and comfort, but anything with high fructose corn syrup and 177 other ingredients will not.

Trim the Fat from Your Budget
Debt will keep you up at night and contribute to feelings of low self-worth and hopelessness. Take charge of your finances and stop spending on non-essentials. Track your daily expenses for a week or two and decide where you can cut back. Notice the items you accumulate mindlessly.

Plan a Day Trip
When you spend time in nature, you give your mind and body a much needed break from the hustle and bustle which causes you to Google things like “How to get rid of anxiety” in the first place. Chances are no matter where you live, there’s a serene, interesting and charming place within a couple hours.

Go to Bed Early
This may sound impossible if you’re accustomed to staying up late to catch up on the To-Do list. But this one’s a MUST. Sleep deprivation is a huge anxiety culprit. Inadequate shuteye can amplify the brain’s anticipatory reactions, upping overall anxiety levels, according to research

Wake up 15 Minutes Early
Like most anxious people, you’re probably rushing around in the morning and yelling at everyone in your wake, “Hurry up! We’re going to be late!” Go slowly, and set yourself up for a relaxed day ahead. If you start to worry about the To-Do list, take a deep breath and think, There is enough time.

Get Your Lavender On!
Lavender oil has many healing properties and can be used as a natural remedy to reduce anxiety and other nervous conditions. There are many ways to incorporate lavender into your calm tool kit:

Reduce Caffeine, Sugar and Processed Foods From Your Diet
Caffeine can cause heart palpitations if you ingest too much. Caffeine also can trigger panic or anxiety attacks, especially if you have an anxiety disorder. Hypoglycaemia, or low blood sugar, can also cause palpitations.

Know that Feelings Are Not Facts
One of the hardest jobs of a hypnotherapist is to convince your anxious client that the feelings of low self-worth, guilt and shame are not accurate. Negative thoughts cause negative feelings.

Challenge Negative Core Beliefs
Remember that thoughts precede feelings. Negative thoughts lead to negative emotions, which lead to negative behaviours.

Get Some Accountability
If you’re BFF with Nervous Nellie or Anxious Allen, put your keyed-up energy to good use. Vow to work on healthier ways to cope when feeling stressed together.
Attend a Social Gathering (Even If You Don’t Want To)
If you’re prone to social anxiety, it’s important to make time for socialization. It’s cool to be an introvert, but know that we live in a universe that revolves around connecting with others.

Exercise, Exercise, Exercise!
Exercise is nature’s anti-anxiety remedy. Besides clearing the mind, firing up the endorphins, and helping you sleep soundly at night, researchers have found that individuals who exercise vigorously and regularly were 25 percent less likely to develop an anxiety disorder within five years.

Accept Your Anxiety
Whether you inherited the “anxiety gene” from your parents, or your lifestyle, or both, accept your anxiety rather than fight it. It’s not about rolling over and giving up. Understand you have to work hard every day to bring calm to your environment. Remember there’s always options in life, and worse fates exist than being anxiety-sensitive. After all, when push comes to shove, at the end of the (stressed out) day, anxious people get the job done!

Schedule a Visit with a Therapist
Nobody deserves to feel bad. A qualified mental health professional is your best bet if your anxiety is unbearable.
PS. I know a good one. 🙂

www.jonadkin.com His brilliant

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These anxiety quotes not only provide inspiration,

but they give you a look into what it’s like living with anxiety and panic.

“You can’t stop the waves, but you can learn to surf.”

“Even when things are wonderful.

I’m always waiting for something horrible to happen.”

“Even the simplest task can be overwhelming at time.”

“I say “sorry” a lot, mostly because I feel everything is my fault.”

“Today I will not stress over things I can’t control.”

“I’m terrified that even if I try my hardest, I still won’t be good enough.”

“Too many of us are not living our dreams because we are living our fears.”

“When you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change.”

“You are strong for getting out of bed in the morning when it feels like hell.

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I hope you enjoyed this Blog. Please let me know if you use any of these tips. More detailed advice can be found in my book ‘Can I Change‘ available from Amazon in Paperback and Kindle versions.

Until Next time

Have a great week. Best wishes

Jon X

Have a good night.

Hi This week my blog is looking at night time Anxiety. I hope that you have found some of the tips that I offered helpful over the last few weeks. Anxiety can affect us in so many different ways and sometimes you don’t even realise that it is anxiety that you are suffering from.

Anxiety at Night.

Night time is often considered to be a time of relaxation, where we mentally unwind and prepare ourselves for sleep. However, it is still quite common to experience an anxiety attack at night.
Anxiety attacks are frightening at the best of times, but when they occur unexpectedly in the silence and darkness of night time, they can be particularly hard to endure. In theory, we are at our most relaxed when we are asleep, so it seems an unlikely time for anxiety to flare up. However, this is a common problem.

What causes anxiety attacks at night?

Night time anxiety or panic attacks, like their day time cohorts, result from the ‘fight or flight’ instinct being triggered by a perceived aggressor. In this case, the aggressor is likely to be mental angst resulting from pent up worries.
In the business of daily life they recede into the background only to rear their monstrous heads when all distractions disappear. In the stillness of the night there is no running away, and if we allow the worry monster to keep up its aggression, an anxiety attack may well ensue.
We also know that the brain does not fully switch off when we are asleep. How often does an event that occurred during the day lead to an odd dream during the night? Our brain naturally tries to process and sort out the day’s events and if these have been stressful then our dreams may well provoke anxiety too.

What can I do to stop anxiety attacks at night?

Trying to fight a night time panic attack will only make it worse. Combat this as you would an anxiety attack during the day; try to slow down, breathe deeply, relax your muscles and calm your mind with whatever thoughts or images help to make you feel safe.
The adrenaline may continue to course through your body, so it is unlikely that you will be able to just to drop off back to sleep. You may even just begin worrying about not sleeping so it can help to get up and do something else to shift your focus. Ideally, simple activities like the ironing, listening to a calming meditation, reading an inspirational or gentle book etc. or even practising yoga poses for sleep may help.
Avoid any over stimulating activity. Only once you are feel ready for sleep should you go back to bed. When you lie down, remain calm by breathing deeply in through your nose and out through your mouth; if you are breathing correctly, your abdomen (not just your chest) will be rising on an in breath and falling on an out breath.
It is possible to learn how to rationally identify and accept the anxiety attack, and allow the fear to pass. With practise of sensible tools and techniques, anxiety attacks will diminish in severity and frequency.

More Night time Tips

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Sleep by the clock

When it comes to sleep, timing is everything, as Dr Michael Breus reveals in a new ground-breaking book. Our circadian rhythm – also known as the biological clock – affects every aspect of our life, including our ability to sleep well. Going to bed at the correct bio time means you won’t lie awake feeling wired.
Wind down, not up
Sleep is a natural physiological process – but you can help it along and avoid additional anxiety by having a set wind-down routine. The goal of this is to relax your body and prime it for sleep. So if you’re going to bed at 10-11pm, set aside 30 minutes to an hour for an identical nightly pre-sleep routine. This may involve things such as taking a shower, washing your face and brushing your teeth, moisturising your face, putting on your PJs and climbing into bed with a book. Psychologist Susanna Halonen says, ‘The more identical you can make every evening, the more you train your body to prepare for sleep and the easier it will be to achieve.’
Keep a cork in it
‘Alcohol is a stimulant as well as a sedative,’ says Dr Guy Meadows of The Sleep School. ‘While many people use it to fall asleep, it is also metabolised so quickly that it can leave the body craving more.’ So when we drink alcohol close to bedtime, we are more likely to wake up in the early hours, leaving us primed for a night-time anxiety attack. As a rule of thumb, it takes an hour to process one unit of alcohol, so to be on the safe side, have a last glass of wine at 7pm if you intend to go to bed at 10pm.

Soak it up

Taking a relaxing bath can help de-clutter the mind. Try a few drops of Therapy Relaxing Bath Essence – one that contains lavender, which is a natural sleep aid. There’s an added benefit to bath time, too: the fall in body temperature we experience when we get out of the bath is a signal for the brain to start producing sleep-inducing melatonin.
Breathe and let go
Practising deep breathing can distract your mind from worries, explains Dr Ramlakhan. ‘Breathe in, hold for a few seconds and then breathe out – do this three times. Just follow the breathing as you do it.’ Breathing in this way instantly slows everything down, relaxes the mind and body, and helps channel your energy into the breathing action. The breathing will give way to the tiredness, which will overcome anxiety and help you fall asleep.
Junk the caffeine
Avoid caffeine after 2pm, suggests Will Williams. ‘Caffeine is a powerful stimulant, and it takes six hours for our body to recover from a single cup of tea or coffee. If you feel you need a hit of caffeine to get you through the afternoon, then consider learning to meditate to give you more energy throughout the day.’

That’s all for this week. I will continue with nighttime anxiety next week.

Until then have a great week and smile more. It makes you feel so much better.

Take care

Jon X

Jon Adkin BAHyp Hypnotherapist.

Extracts from ‘Can I change‘ by Jon Adkin BAHyp Available from Amazon 

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Good Afternoon…Or is it?

Hi

Well I have looked at morning anxiety, so let’s look at afternoon and evening  anxiety this week.

Anxiety is the sense of uneasiness, worry, and apprehension that most people are accustomed to experiencing every so often. For people with an anxiety disorder, these have become a way of life that need to be carefully managed in order to function and live a fulfilling life.
Whether or not you have been diagnosed with an anxiety disorder, such as panic disorder, you may find it difficult to control your anxiety or nervousness. Many people experience morning anxiety, feeling unnerved about the day ahead. Others struggle with anxiety throughout the day, feeling perturbed most of the day through. While many people will find that their evenings are filled with anxiety-related worry and tension.
Anxiety that strikes in the afternoon and evening can be incredibly bothersome as it may take away from your free time, zap your energy, and even contribute to sleep issues. For panic sufferers, increased anxiety can result in panic attacks. Fortunately, there are steps you can take to help reduce your evening anxiety, allowing for a fun and relaxing evening to a restful night.
Read on for 6 tips to that may help you overcome evening anxiety.

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Set an Intention Early:

Many of us go from one activity to the next throughout our day without really considering how we are feeling, let alone how we would like to feel. For example, do you ever come home after a long day of work and think to yourself, “I really want to relax and enjoy this evening?” Most likely you are far too busy or preoccupied to stop and ponder how you want your evening to be. However, by setting an intention early, you are more likely to get the results you want. So, for instance, if you remind yourself each day that you are determined to have a peaceful evening, you are more likely to actually experience it that way. Remembering to set an intention is easier when you mark a certain point in your day for it. For example, while driving home from work, you may be going over in your mind all the stress that you went through that day. At a certain point during your drive home, such as when you drive over a bridge or pass a certain landmark, you can set the intention to let go of work stress from that point forward and enjoy the rest of your evening.

Learn to Be Present:

Along the same lines of not being in touch with how we want to feel, many of us spend much of our time completely unaware or detached from the present moment. By making an effort to be more mindful, you may be better able to enjoy your evening. Mindfulness can prevent you from going over every worry in your head and allow you to recognize that you do not have to react to every thought that pops into your mind. Try to listen closely to your loved ones, enjoy the food you are eating, notice the beauty of the earth – these are all simple ways to push anxiety aside and become more mindful.

Leave Some Extra Transition Time:

Transition time is the time that is needed between tasks. Many of us underestimate how much transition time is needed. For instance, your evening may consist of numerous different tasks that you need to do before you go to bed.
Whatever amount of time you have allotted for each task, add a bit more time as a buffer should a task take longer than you think. That way you will avoid feeling overwhelmed, trying to cram too much in before bedtime.

Prepare for the Next Day:

Many people find it anxiety-provoking to think about all that they need to do the next day. One of the best things to do to avoid this type of anxiety is to be prepared. Get as much ready as you can, like having your clothes picked out, lunches and bags packed, and your alarm clock set. Putting a small amount of effort into preparation can help keep evening anxiety under control.

Create Some Space to Unwind:

When everything is done for the night and ready for the next day, you do need some time to relax and re energize. Set time aside each evening to simply relax and let go. You may find it nice to practice a relaxation technique, such as deep breathing, journaling, or yoga. Perhaps you find it comforting to read a book. Maybe you unwind best with a warm bath or tea.
Regardless of what brings you serenity, spend at least 10 minutes for some downtime each evening. Doing so will allow you to feel calmer throughout your evening and may even be the start for getting a good night’s rest.

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Establish a Bedtime Routine:

Establishing a bedtime routine lets you focus on taking proactive steps for yourself instead ruminating in your anxiety. Your bedtime routine may include activities such as taking a shower, brushing your teeth, changing into pyjamas, reading from an inspirational book, prayer, or listening to music.
Your bedtime routine should be established to help set you up for better rest. Don’t include any activities that may be too overstimulating, such as reading through social media or watching TV. Instead, allow your routine to be quiet, leading up to you falling asleep. This will signal to your brain that it is time to rest and will allow you to go to sleep without an upset and anxious mind.
Belly breath

Well there you are 6 tips to help you with afternoon and evening anxiety. Next week night time anxiety.

Let me know if these help.

These tips and extracts are taken from my book. ‘Can I change?‘ available from Amazon in paperback and kindle.

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Have a great week

Best wishes

Jon x

Jon Adkin BAHyp Hypnotherapist.

Which mindset do you have?

Hi

Welcome to a new week and if your reading this on Tuesday, welcome to a new month. After last weeks curve ball of a blog about my travels, this week I want to return to what I know and do best.

I want to discuss mindset.

Can what you believe about yourself impact your success or failure? Psychologists think so. They believe your beliefs play a major role in what you want and whether you achieve it. So what is a mindset? People with a fixed mindset believe that these qualities are inborn, fixed, and unchangeable whereas those with a growth mindset, believe that these abilities can be developed and strengthened by way of commitment and hard work.

Let’s keep it simple before we dive in. A mindset is a way of thinking. a frame of mind. Your mindset is your collection of thoughts and beliefs that shape your thought habits.  And your thought habits affect how you think, what you feel, and what you do.  Your mind-set impacts how you make sense of the world, and how you make sense of you.

Your mindset is a big deal.

Why is it that some people seem to shine in any area in which they choose to exert themselves, and others cannot manage even a glimmer despite obvious talent?

Research shows that it’s the way that they think about their ability that really counts.

There are two ways to view intelligence or ability:

Ability it is fixed or ingrained – in other words, we are born with a certain level of ability and we cannot change that. This is called a fixed mindset.

We can develop our ability through hard work and effort. This is called a growth mindset.

These two different beliefs lead to different behaviour, and to different results. For example, students with a growth mindset were shown to increase their grades over time. Those who believed that their intelligence was ingrained did not. in fact, their grades got worse.

Having a growth mindset (the belief that you are in control of your own ability and can learn and improve) is the key to success.

This is why you should never praise children by talking about their ability, but instead describe the effort that they put in, and how much they have learned and developed their ability through the activity.

Don’t say: “Well done. You’re really good at maths.”

Do say: “That’s great. You tried really hard and look how well you’ve done.”

It is important to praise the process, not the talent or ability.

Believe in myself

Jon Adkin Hypnotherapist.

Mindset in Practice

People with these two mindsets actually think differently and also react to information differently.

In particular, they respond differently to information about performance.

In people with a fixed mindset, the brain is most active when they are being given information about how well they have done, for example, test results, grades or praise.

Whereas people with a growth mindset, the brain is most active when they are being told what they could do to improve.

It’s a very different approach: from ‘How did I do?’ to ‘What can I do better next time?’

One is about how they are perceived, and one is about how they can learn. You can see which one is likely to lead to better results in future.

How do you deal with setbacks may tell you what mindset you have.

People with a fixed mindset are very discouraged by setbacks, because a setback dents their belief in their ability. They tend to become uninterested and give up.

People with a growth mindset view a setback as an opportunity to learn. They tend to try harder in an effort to overcome the problem.

I am a strong believer that success and happiness are all about mindset. Your mindset and belief system affect everything in your life from what you think and feel to how you act and react to the world around you.

In order to achieve your goals, your mindset needs to match your aspirations, otherwise, it might be holding you back from getting where you want to be.

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Available from Amazon in Paperback and Kindle 

Here are some effective ways you can upgrade your mindset:

  1. Change your Self-Talk

The conversations you have with yourself are a direct reflection of your mindset. If you are telling yourself “I am not good enough to achieve my dreams”, your thoughts will create your reality and your mindset will hold you back from having the life you want. To upgrade your mindset, change your negative self-talk to an empowerment speech. Sounds strange, but telling yourself “I can do this” or “I got this”, really works.

  1. Change your Language

After changing your inner thought dialogue and the story you are telling yourself, change the way you talk to other people. Avoid phrases like “I am always like this” or “I am always doing this” for encouraging a growth mindset. Also make it a habit to talk about the things that are going well in your life instead of complaining and talking about your problems. This will encourage a mindset of abundance instead of fear and lack.

  1. Determine the mindset you need and act as if

Pick a goal you want to achieve and ask yourself: “Which mindset do I need to achieve this goal?” and “Which mindset do people have that were successful at this goal?”.

For example, healthy & fit people might share the mindset “I love taking care of my body, nourishing it with whole foods and exercising every day.”. If it’s your goal to be healthy & fit, act as if you already HAVE the mindset of a healthy & fit person. This way, you are basically tricking your brain to adopt a new mindset and reinforcing it with action.

  1. Learn & Apply

Read books from great minds to understand and adopt their thinking. Read books about how the mind and brain works. Learn from mindset experts through online courses, events, and coaching.

Here are some mindset resources:

Mindset by Carol Dweck to learn about the growth mindset

Everything from Gabrielle Bernstein to adopt a mindset of abundance and align with the flow of life

The writing of Thomas Oppong on Medium for great nuggets on improving your thinking

  1. Surround yourself with people that match your desired mindset

Want to upgrade your money & success mindset? Start hanging out with people that are very successful and seem to have an abundance of money flowing their way at any time. It is easier to adopt a new mindset when you see that it is already working for other people. Learn how they think and adapt their daily habits to match their mindset.

  1. Create new habits to support your mindset change

Integrate powerful habits into your day that help your mindset change and reinforce your thinking with action. If you are upgrading from “fixed” to “growth” mindset, schedule time for learning and start noting down your learnings and achievements every day. If you are upgrading from “destination” to “journey” mindset, practice being mindful, enjoying the present moment and celebrating small successes.

  1. Step out of your comfort zone

If you put yourself in situations that challenge you, you have no other choice than to rise to the occasion and upgrade your mindset. It becomes a necessity to survive.

So ask yourself “What situations can I put myself in that will require me to operate on a higher mindset?”. Basically, the idea is to engineer your environment to train your brain!

Remember be careful in how you talk to yourself as we believe what we hear and we are listening to ourselves all the time.

Now I’m a little guy but I’ve had some really big guys in my Hypnotherapy practice where I have used a convincer shown to me by a fellow hypnotherapist to show them the power of our mind, and little old me was able to overpower a 6 foot giant (well I am only 5’4″).

So what mindset do you think you have and why do you think that? I would love to know.

Until next week. Have a great one

Jon x

I am a hypnotherapist based in Suffolk, I work in Suffolk, Cambridge and Essex.  I have written 6 children’s books and 1 adult anxiety book. I also paint (and I don’t mean my living room and kitchen )

 

Are you Mr or Mrs Angry?

Hi.

In my hypnotherapy practice I have recently seen a big increase with clients visiting me saying they can’t contain their anger and frustration.  The good thing is that they are contacting me and are wanting to do something about it. but why is this happening now?

Could it be Brexit. Could it be extra worry about what’s happening to our country. or is it just life in general?

Anger itself isn’t a problem — it’s how you handle it. Consider the nature of anger, as well as how to manage anger and what to do when you’re confronted by someone whose anger is out of control.

What is anger?

Anger is a natural response to perceived threats. It causes your body to release adrenaline, your muscles to tighten, and your heart rate and blood pressure to increase. Your senses might feel more acute and your face and hands flushed.

However, anger becomes a problem only when you don’t manage it in a healthy way.

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So it’s not ‘bad’ to feel angry?

Being angry isn’t always a bad thing. Being angry can help you share your concerns. It can prevent others from walking all over you. It can motivate you to do something positive. The key is managing your anger in a healthy way.

What causes people to get angry?

There are many common triggers for anger, such as losing your patience, feeling as if your opinion or efforts aren’t appreciated, and injustice. Other causes of anger include memories of traumatic or enraging events and worrying about personal problems.

You also have unique anger triggers, based on what you were taught to expect from yourself, others and the world around you. Your personal history feeds your reactions to anger, too. For example, if you weren’t taught how to express anger appropriately, your frustrations might simmer and make you miserable, or build up until you explode in an angry outburst.

Inherited tendencies, brain chemistry or underlying medical conditions also play a role in your tendency toward angry outburst.

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What’s the best way to handle anger?

When you’re angry, you can deal with your feelings through:

  • Expression. This is the act of conveying your anger. Expression ranges from a reasonable, rational discussion to a violent outburst.
  • Suppression. This is an attempt to hold in your anger and possibly convert it into more constructive behavior. Suppressing anger, however, can cause you to turn your anger inward on yourself or express your anger through passive-aggressive behavior.
  • Calming down. This is when you control your outward behavior and your internal responses by calming yourself and letting your feelings subside.

Ideally, you’ll choose constructive expression — stating your concerns and needs clearly and directly, without hurting others or trying to control them.

Can anger harm your health?

Some research suggests that inappropriately expressing anger — such as keeping anger pent up — can be harmful to your health. Suppressing anger appears to make chronic pain worse, while expressing anger reduces pain.

There’s also evidence that anger and hostility is linked with heart disease, high blood pressure, peptic ulcers and stroke.

When is professional help needed?

Learning to control anger is a challenge for everyone at times. Consider seeking help for anger issues if your anger seems out of control, causes you to do things you regret, hurts those around you or is taking a toll on your personal relationships.

How does hypnotherapy help with anger?

Feeling angry now and then is a normal part of life. Usually, anger is a result of feeling frustrated, insulted, deceived or even under attack. For many, anger is a natural reaction that passes quickly. In some instances, however, it can become a difficult emotion to control.

Failing to manage anger effectively can lead to mental and physical health problems. You may find your anger management issues are affecting your relationships, your work or even your self-esteem.

Hypnotherapy can help those with anger management problems in several ways. The initial aim of the hypnotherapist will be to understand the root cause of your anger.

As previously mentioned, anger management problems often stem from past experiences. These experiences can shape your behaviour and belief system. So, while you may think another person or situation is causing your anger, it may well come from yourself. Once this is understood, your hypnotherapist can begin work changing this.

To do so, your hypnotherapist will work on a conscious and unconscious level to help change your negative thought processes. Doing this may involve relaxation techniques and suggestions from your hypnotherapist to help control your anger.

The hope is that this will change your reaction to anger triggers. Instead of feeling overwhelmed and angry, you should feel calmer and more relaxed. Feeling calmer in stressful situations helps you to think more clearly so you can react in a more appropriate way.

Anger management hypnotherapy can also help with some of the symptoms of anger. For example, if you are suffering from anxiety, stress or depression, hypnotherapy can be helpful.

The number of anger management hypnotherapy sessions you’ll need will depend on your individual circumstances. It is likely that your hypnotherapist will teach you some self-hypnosis techniques and relaxation tips. You can use these at home when you feel angry or stressed to help you control your anger in the long-term.

How to deal with anger – self-help tips

If you have decided to seek professional help for your anger management problem, there are several things you can do in tandem to help regain control. The following tips can help you control your anger and express it in a healthy way.

Get to know your triggers

Understanding what situations make you feel angry is key. By recognising when you are likely to feel angry, you can be prepared. To do this, start taking notes when you feel angry. Try to note the following:

  • What was the situation?
  • Was there another person involved?
  • What did they say/do to make you feel angry?
  • How did you feel at the time?
  • How did you behave?
  • How did you feel after the incident?

After a while, you should start to notice some patterns emerging. Perhaps you get angry when you feel belittled, or maybe you feel angrier after the situation because you couldn’t express yourself at the time.

Talk through your notes with your hypnotherapist, as this can help them work with you to understand the underlying reason behind your anger. Just recognising these patterns can be an enormous help.

Give yourself some time

A simple way to help you manage your anger when a trigger situation arises is to give yourself some time before you react. This allows you to really think about how you react, rather than reacting instinctively. Try the following suggestions to see if they help:

  • Take some deep breaths – breathing out for longer than you breathe in can help to calm you.
  • Count to 10 – a simple act that can give you enough time to calm yourself before you react.
  • Do something else – instead of reacting, try to distract yourself by doing something else. If you can, try to channel that energy into something creative.
  • Listen to calming music/sounds – create a calming playlist and listen to it when you start to feel angry.

Try a few different distraction techniques and see what works best for you. Again, this is something you can discuss with your hypnotherapist as they may have some alternative suggestions.

Don’t bottle it up. Don’t aim it at the wrong people. control it.  If you’re local let me help. Don’t let anger rule and ruin your life and the lives of those around you. Your children will act like you and copy your reactions, and sometimes they don’t have the understanding in how to control it.

Until next time.

Jon

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